Dale Eicke’s replacement at Dream Chaser Racing

By Ben Mozart Amarillo, TX: In the wake of Dale Eicke’s untimely death in August, 2013, Brad Klein, his employer and proprietor of Dream Chaser Racing Engines, is seeking a replacement. “We’d like to find someone who can bring the unique knowledge that Dale contributed,” said Klein, “and though I don’t know that Dale can be replaced, I am certainly short handed and I’m trying to find the right person.” In the past, the firm employed a cylinder head specialist and an engine machinist that could also perform the assembly work, but currently they are seeking the combination that Dale offered. Ninety percent of Dream Chaser’s business entails the careful preparation of high-end drag racing engines, most of them naturally aspirated. The tasks include cylinder head preparation and automotive machine work and fabricating. “Dale was pretty handy in this environment, remarked Brad Klein. You give him a lathe, a mill, and a TIG welder and there wasn’t much he couldn’t create—and it didn’t take him long to do it.” Those interested in this new prospect who feels qualified please call (806) 371-7288 or contact Brad Klein at:...
Power steering:  Three common shortcomings, two helpful tips

Power steering: Three common shortcomings, two helpful tips

By Freddie Heaney –   Photography by Moore Good Ink: In the early 1990’s, before power steering became prevalent in F1 racing cars, Michael Schumacher, statistically the greatest driver the sport has seen, remarked, “You have to carefully judge the amount of steering angle required as you turn into a high-speed corner, as it is very difficult to correct if your assessment is wrong.” His comment came as a result of increased steering caster angles, functioning at 9-12 degrees that made the steering heavy. The problem was further exacerbated by increasingly high aerodynamic down forces. Over twenty years later, power steering still has its abiding problems: slow response; unnecessary parasitic losses; and premature pulley failures are three of the most common. But first, commit to memory these two valuable tips. 1) Should a power steering pump fail, ensure the lines are subsequently flushed clean. If not, the new replacement pump will be immediately sabotaged by shrapnel remaining in the system from the original failure. 2) Power steering hoses, in common with all high pressure hoses, are typically made from layers of rubber, steel braiding and cloth. If you use an abrasive cut-off wheel on power steering hoses, it will cause the rubber to melt. To complicate matters further, sand particles from the abrasive wheel together with metal particles from the braided steel will adhere to the melted rubber. Later, when the system is assembled and operating at normal temperature, the globules of rubber with sand and metal particles glued to the inside of the hose will melt. Soon after, they’ll be delivered to the pump, which they’ll destroy, usually in...

How F1 cars achieved constant ride height

By Bertie Scott Brown:  Dave Hamer, who helped develop the highly successful hydraulic system now in widespread use on Formula One cars, was one of dozens of racing personalities attracted to this year’s Goodwood Revival. In 2009 Hamer, a senior R&D engineer at the Renault F1 team, formerly Benetton and later rebadged Lotus F1, developed a hydraulic system called Pro Pitch System (PPS) that strived to maintain constant ride height. As a consequence it brought much benefit to the car’s aero systems. The system came about when head of R&D, Robin Tuluie, handed Hamer several hydraulic rams to replace the center springs on the seven-post rig car and said, “Have a play with these.” Though the units were too small, they awakened an enticing proposition. As most racing followers know, ride height particularly front ride height plays a critical part of any successful F1 car. They all require a stiff, stable platform and as the car travels faster, the closer it moves toward ground level. Powerful aerodynamic energy pushes down on the car and transmits the forces through the tires. “Since the banning of active suspension in 1993, explains Hamer, “we had strived to control the car’s ride height without conceding mechanical grip. So for the 1994 season, we tried using some of the car’s damping forces to pump the suspension up, similar to the technology used in Boge dampers. At that time Boge supplied dampers to BMW for use on their touring motorcycles. Their chief objective was to achieve consistent ride height regardless of whether the bike was carrying a passenger or luggage. “Later we fitted a 10kg...

Over $80,000 bounty to 2013 Engine Masters Challenge winner

By Archie Bosman Contingency sponsors have guaranteed a handsome reward that could exceed $80,000 for the 11th Annual 2013 AMSOIL Engine Masters Challenge.  The competition, which celebrates the gathering of the country’s finest engine builders—around 33 contenders— will be contested at the University of Northwestern Ohio (UNOH) in Lima, October 7-11, 2013. The Challenge, which measures engine power produced on a dynamometer, begins each day at 8am and ends at 5pm from Monday to Thursday. On Friday, October 11, the top five scoring contenders compete in the final round eliminations, starting 7:30am and ending 3:30pm. Half an hour later, at 4pm, the awards ceremony will be conducted, followed by tear-down and inspection at 4:30pm. Top participants are likely to be four-time winners Jon Kaase Racing Engines and BES Racing, as well as last year’s champion SAM (School of Automotive Machinists). For this year’s competition Kaase has prepared two engines: a 4-valve Modular motor and a Boss hemi. Regarding this year’s prize winnings, EMC organizers have reverted to the policy of earlier times, wherein the majority of the spoils go to the winner: second place receives one-thirtieth of the victor’s purse. To their everlasting credit, forty-seven sponsors have emerged to maintain the prestige of the 2013 Engine Masters Challenge. These include Diamond pistons, Total Seal piston rings, Demon carburetors, Holley carburetors, fuel injection and intake manifolds, Jon Kaase Racing cylinder heads, MME engine blocks, Stefs oil pans. Revived by MME (McKeown Motorsport Engineering), the world’s first aftermarket Cleveland engine entered production earlier this year. It is called Titus. Finally, recent news from Dart alerts us to the coming of an...