Superchargers and carbureted fuel system upgrades.

Superchargers and carbureted fuel system upgrades.

By V. Moore Idle and cruise conditions don’t alter fuel consumption appreciably, but supercharge boost conditions do. Therefore, it’s sensible and probably necessary to increase fuel pressure relative to boost pressure. Bypass fuel systems using a return-style regulator are the most efficient kind. They control fuel pressure constantly to the engine and return the surplus to the tank. The system is more responsive to fluctuating fuel demands, and as the fuel circulates from hot engine bays, it averts power losses and stalling from vapor locks. The advantage of the in-tank fuel pump is durability because it is submerged in cool fuel. Also, it is much easier to push fuel than to pull fuel. The disadvantage of the in-tank fuel pump, especially with high performance vehicles, is that if the fuel level in the tank is low, the fuel becomes warm because the pump is warm and the desired cooling effect is lost. Best practice is not to allow fuel level to fall below half tank or avoid driving with low fuel. The formula for upgrading a fuel system. The formula for determining a fuel system’s capability is based on a vehicle’s horsepower output. Typically, an engine consumes ½lb of fuel per horsepower per hour. Therefore, feeding 500hp requires 250lbs of fuel per hour. As 1 gallon of fuel weighs approximately 7lbs, simply divide 250 by 7 to find the answer, which is 35.7 gallons. Thus, a fuel pump is required that generates a minimum of 40 gallons (150 liters) per hour to feed the engine at maximum boost-referenced pressure. Typically, 15 percent is added to maximum flow. This allows...
Boost referencing the blow-through carburetor (4150-style) and fuel pressure regulator

Boost referencing the blow-through carburetor (4150-style) and fuel pressure regulator

By V. Moore Conventional carburetors operate at prevailing barometric pressures, from oxygen-rich sea level to oxygen-lean Denver, a mile high in Colorado. Blow-through carburetors, which work in conjunction with centrifugal superchargers and turbochargers, operate with boosted pressure. It’s a contrasting concept that accelerates the induction process. It impels higher velocity fuel flow through the main jets and robustly emulsifies the air-fuel mixture in the metering passageways, as it makes its way to the carburetor’s boost venturii. The boost venturii are carefully positioned in a choked area, an area with a reduced cross-section to increase the air speed. Increased air speed lowers the air pressure at the small discharge orifice in the booster, extracting the air-fuel mixture into the air stream on its journey to the cylinders. When boost pressure enters the fuel bowls, via the two vent tubes, its force lowers the fuel levels and quickly becomes so potent with increasing engine speed that the needle-and-seat valves cannot keep pace with demand. To maintain the critical fuel levels, the fuel pump pressure must match that of the boost pressure in the bowls, allowing the floats to regain control and regulate fuel levels. This is resolved by boost-referencing. Boost-referencing Boost-referencing compels the fuel pump to generate increased flow / pressure. It occurs by connecting the boost reference port of the fuel-pressure regulator to the carburetor or intake manifold. Via a small-bore hose, boost pressure is applied to the diaphragm located in the atmospheric chamber of the fuel-pressure regulator. As the diaphragm moves, it opens an orifice, allowing the fuel to flow past the ball-and-seat to the carburetor. When the engine...
Bradenton, Florida: Inaugural TorqStorm Superchargers 2020 True Street event

Bradenton, Florida: Inaugural TorqStorm Superchargers 2020 True Street event

By Sam Logan: Naturally, there’s a desire within the TorqStorm operation to introduce enthusiasts to their billet supercharger. But also there’s a keenness to acquaint them with the racing scene, especially those with no former competition experience. So 2020 marks the beginning of a new era for TorqStorm, an initiative with the NMCA to sponsor their well-established True Street class. True Street rules call for the entrants to take a 30-mile cruise followed by three successive drag strip passes. As a special feature for this event, they were led by Drag Week winner Tom Bailey and his Camaro with YouTube celebrity Cleetus McFarland occupying the passenger’s seat.     The race results were as follows: Mike French triumphed, motoring to an overall win with an 8.77sec average, while Jason Rollins claimed runner-up, finishing with an 8.96 average. Willard Howard was the tour de force in the 9-second category, Jeff Smith the 10-second, and TorqStorm’s own Jeff Neibarger was the 11-second winner. Grant Martin won the 12-second category, with Jose Vera and Jimmy Hodges winning the 13-second and 14-second categories respectively.  Branden Arila took the spoils in the 15-second...
Steering feel: In all probability 90% of oval track racers don’t know how to acquire it

Steering feel: In all probability 90% of oval track racers don’t know how to acquire it

By Archie Bosman–  Kennesaw, GA: Using the correct flow valve: Electric steering in mass-produced road cars is now widespread. It is a little like ethanol in our fuel: you’ll be hard pressed to find an enthusiast who favors it yet we are stuck with it. But actually we aren’t. Hydraulic power steering systems that provide superior feel are still readily available to the racer. However, it is not widely known that steering pumps can be tuned for more feel or alternatively for more assistance. Optimizing feel to the racer’s steering is a bewildering task for most of us. But KRC Power Steering accomplished it by introducing a range of replaceable flow control valves for their hydraulic steering pumps. The flow control valves, nine in number, perform a function similar to that of jets in a carburetor. In varying their flow from 4 to 12 liters per minute, approximately one to three gallons, the largest orifice provides maximum steering assistance while the smallest provides maximum steering feel. Though the standard KRC pump flows 8 liters per minute, by using flow control valves with larger orifices, those marked B, C, D, or E, the flow rate can be increased to 12 liters per minute (3.17gals) in one-liter increments. The higher letter indicates greater hydraulic assistance, although less feel. In contrast, flow valves marked with numbers 4, 5, 6, and 7 provide less assistance; the lower the number, the greater the feel but the less assistance. Momentary loss of power or “pump catch” So how do you achieve optimum steering feel? According to KRC’s Ken Roper you reduce the size of flow...
How to change the oil on a TorqStorm supercharger.

How to change the oil on a TorqStorm supercharger.

Since TorqStorm’s beginning, about ten years ago, inquirers have written on virtually every aspect of forced induction. Oil-changing procedures is a popular topic. Required at 10,000-mile intervals or once a year, whichever comes first, here are the four steps with pictures and captions to clarify. Step 1 Remove your supercharger from your car and flip it over onto backside to access drain plug. Step 2 Remove drain plug with 1/4in Allen wrench and drain oil. Step 3 Through the drain hole, pour 6fl oz of TorqStorm-specific oil. Step 4 Replace drain plug and tighten to 15lbs- ft of torque.   An oil change must be performed every 10,000 miles or once a year, whichever comes first. Failure to do so will void the warranty. Oil can be purchased directly from TorqStorm for $6: Part# ARP-OIL-GT46   TorqStorm SuperchargersTorqStorm.comTelephone (616) 706-5580 or visit www.TorqStorm.com or e-mail the knowledgeable Chris Beardsley...
TorqStorm Superchargers has broadened its focus.

TorqStorm Superchargers has broadened its focus.

In 2020, TorqStorm will participate in a new campaign, sponsoring NMCA’s True Street, a quarter-mile drag racing class for grass-roots enthusiasts, including those who have never raced before. The racing campaign promises to be a welcome addition, particularly the early March event for those who enjoy a little racing and an early vacation in the sun. With scarcely time to draw breath following a busy 2019 season of shows, developing new supercharger applications, moving to larger premises, and managing increased production schedules, 2020 is hoped to be a landmark year.   Both TorqStorm co-founders, Chris Brooker and Scott Oshinski, plan participation at all six NMCA racing venues as well as the two LS Fest events and perhaps two Mopar adventures (Hemi Fest at Summit Sports Park, Norwalk, and Mopar Nationals at National Trails Columbus). The True Street calendar of events is as follows: March 5-8         18th Annual NMCA       Bradenton Motorsports Park     Bradenton, FL              April 2-5           12th Annual NMCA       Atlanta Dragway                    Commerce, GA May 28-31        Inaugural NMCA            Technology R’way, Gateway      Madison, IL July 30-Aug 2    15th Annual NMCA       Route 66 Raceway                     Joliet, IL Aug 27-30         19th Annual NMCA       Summit M’Sports Park               Norwalk, OH Sep 24-27         19th Annual NMCA       Indianapolis Raceway Park         Indianapolis, IN NMCA’s True Street class permits enthusiasts to race on premium tracks at a cost of $125 over the course of three days, (Thursday is regarded as set-up day) and the average car count for the class numbers around 50 but can climb to 125 at some venues. Prizes are awarded to the overall winner and runner-up. Prizes are also awarded for the best 9-second average, 10sec, 11sec,...