Handy tuning tips for modular carburetors

Handy tuning tips for modular carburetors

Part 1 of 2-part tuning articles By Sam Logan The carburetor takes responsibility for the emulsification (mixing air with fuel) and the atomization (separating into fine particles) processes while the vaporization (transforming to a gaseous state) occurs in the induction tracts. The engine compresses the vapor and produces the energy. In addition, the carburetor must meet the air-fuel ratio requirements of the engine.To emulsify the air and fuel, small-bore drillings are placed in the air entries on the top of the carburetor. They are known as air bleeds. The emulsified mixture is then drawn rapidly through a multitude of small passageways and distributed into fast moving air streams for atomization. It is discharged through a dozen small ports, three in each throttle bore. They are known as idle ports, transfer slots, and boost venturii. The idle discharge ports and transfer slots are located in the throttle bores of the base plate and draw their source of fuel from the fuel bowls via the carburetor’s idle wells. The boost venturii and their discharge ports are positioned near the top of the carburetor and discharge into the narrowest part of the upper throttle bores. Boost venturii draw their source of fuel from the fuel bowls via the main wells.  In the following text and sequence of pictures and captions we identify some of the chief components of the modular, square-bore carburetor, illustrate their functions, acquaint you with common problems that can arise, and tell you how to prevent them. Idle-Eze. Sloppy idle-speed adjustment is the carburetor’s number 1 tuning problem. It causes the transfer slot to be overexposed and creates mayhem....

Street Demons™ Now Shipping!

Written by Moore Good Ink ANNOUNCING: The All NEW Street Demon™ redefines the street carburetor with clean looks and ease of use! The Street Demon offers enthusiasts a straight-forward carburetor designed to deliver a stable idle, amazingly crisp throttle response and smooth performance. Its optimized calibration and dual mounting pattern make it Run-Ready™ for a large variety of engines and vehicles! Available in Hand Polished, Tumble Polished or Tumble Polished with Aerospace Composite Bowl for significant heat insulating benefits. Get one today and experience Performance That’s Out of This World!   Click here for the complete downloadable PDF  Click here for the Demon Service Parts Pricing Excel File Click here for Demon Service Parts Pricing PDF Click here for hi-resolution images and word text   To obtain further technical details or to place orders contact: Demon Carburetion Scott Witmer Telephone (270) 438-2039 Email: ScottWitmer@DemonCarbs.com www.DemonCarbs.com...
Street Demon: An interview with its designer

Street Demon: An interview with its designer

by Sam Logan   In mid-January 2012, the new 625 Street Demon carburetor was debuted in Los Angeles, California during the MPMC media-manufacturers conference. Designed to suit a large variety of stock to mildly tuned engines of up to 450 horsepower, the Street Demon cuts an elegant figure and caused considerable interest at the conference. Then in mid-February 2012, during pre-production dynamometer experiments, it fuelled a 376cu in LS-3 engine that generated in excess of 450 horsepower. Of course during the normal course of carburetor selection few would consider installing a 625cfm street carburetor on a 500hp engine. Clearly an engine of this capacity ideally requires a bigger carburetor, probably one of 750CFM. Still, evaluation tests or not, the Street Demon carburetor’s performance raised a few eyebrows. The Street Demon’s production is scheduled to begin in early spring 2012 and given the chance to meet its designer, Larry Tipton, it seemed a fine opportunity to get to know more about what had inspired it and how it works. Larry Tipton has spent most of his life in carburetor design and development. He began with Carter in October 1966 in St Louis as a designer of carburetor components and later was appointed to the advanced design group for new carburetion. Today he is the inspiration behind the new 625 Street Demon. 1) What was the inspiration behind the Street Demon? “Since its beginning Demon Carburetion has specialized in racing carburetors, usually for drag racing and for oval track competition and for street-strip and muscle cars. Later the Demon SixShooter and the Demon 98 carburetors and their attendant intake manifold systems were...