First power steering tester reveals more than you might wish to know

First power steering tester reveals more than you might wish to know

By Titus Bloom It’s common knowledge that the entry of one foreign particle in the power steering system can damage the pump. Even if the pump survives the ordeal the refuse will momentarily zap engine power each time it passes through the rotor housing easily consuming 10hp, according to KRC’s new and unique steering pump tester. “This custom-made machine records horsepower, flow and pressure and checks the data every 1,000rpm from 1,000 to 10,000rpm,” says KRC chief Ken Roper. “It even produces graphs and retrieves information we didn’t request! But perhaps its most valuable attribute is that it reveals information we never knew before, like power consumption under load, and it validates everything.” Though the average Sportsman race team may not be too concerned if a steering pump consumes 3hp or 6hp, others like NASCAR teams cannot afford any power-robbing deficiencies and would eagerly welcome even a ½ hp advantage. What caused recent power steering system failures? Recently new short track oval race chassis have suffered a spate of power steering failures. The troubles were traced to the pressure relief valve (spool valve) in the power steering pump. Apparently, galling had caused it to jam in the bore. “For years,” says Roper, “production road car pumps have been modified and offered for use on new race car chassis. As you’d expect, they are inexpensive and most of the time they perform adequately. But they have always been a marginal proposition for race cars as most of their internals are uncoated. Without exception, any friction in the pressure relief valve area slows steering response.” To maintain the valve’s proper function...
Minimizing spark scatter in the Vintage race engine

Minimizing spark scatter in the Vintage race engine

By Sam Logan Photography by Moore Good Ink & V&B Engines Often Vintage racing engines exhibit excessive spark scatter caused by torsional vibration in the distributor drive system. To correct it Virkler & Bartlett adds a miniature flywheel to the system. They mold a series of rubber couplers with a range of Shore A hardness, which allows them to tune the system. Note rubber coupler glued within steel ring.       How to get the best from a Vintage engine ignition system Chatham, Virginia:Vintage racers are often forced to live with points-and-coil ignition. But the most successful know the shortcomings of the ignition system and have it corrected. For the past forty years or so electronic ignition has been the standard, but most Historic race cars produced before the 1970s are equipped with something other. Unfailingly, coil-and-points ignition systems work best when optimized mechanically and electrically. But how is it achieved? Vintage racers seem to run a little faster each year, and as compression ratios and engine speeds creep up, deficiencies in points-and-coil ignition systems can precipitate the perfect storm of performance problems. Background Just over one hundred years ago, the brilliant engineer Charles Kettering invented the ubiquitous battery-powered “points-and-coil” ignition system that first appeared on the 1910 Cadillac. Remarkably, it was used in most cars until the mid-1970s. An engine-driven mechanical cam operated a set of breaker points, switching electrical current to the coil which converted it to high voltage required to fire spark plugs. A rotor within the distributor routed high-voltage impulses to the correct spark plug. The condenser had the dual function of extending the...
How to cure carburetor calibration swings with a fuel pressure regulator

How to cure carburetor calibration swings with a fuel pressure regulator

Written by Moore Good Ink It’s not generally known that carburetor calibration is often dependent on the fuel pressure that enters the fuel bowl. The higher the fuel pressure, the higher the fuel level in the carburetor bowl, and vice versa the lower the pressure, the lower the fuel level. Fluctuations in fuel pressure affect the air-fuel ratios that the carburetor meters. Though the aim is to minimize the pressure drop, maintaining constant, precise fuel level is not strictly possible. As the demand increases the level drops as does the fuel pressure. So there is a balancing act to maintaining good calibration and the chief challenge is how to minimize the pressure drop across the pump’s dynamic flow range.   What Demon found when it upgraded its regulators Initially, the work was necessary because of extra pumping performance they extracted from their fuel pumps: the 400, the 280, the 220 Hot Road, and the 220PS. Moreover, the pumps’ materials were altered to accept a greater variety of fuels, which included gasoline, racing fuels, methanol, ethanol, diesel, and so on. As a consequence the original materials used in the regulators and filters had to be altered accordingly.   But now we get to the really good bit To address the pumps’ increased flow rates Demon purchased the “Best-in-Class” regulators available on the market. They then used those targets as benchmarks for their regulators, which are formerly the BG 2- and 4-port designs as well as the original BG diaphragm-bypass breed. The first priority was to increase the diaphragm’s effective area in all of the regulators to make them more sensitive...
Blockliner update for align-boring cam tunnels

Blockliner update for align-boring cam tunnels

Written by Moore Good Ink Falun, Sweden: Initially designed for the fast and affordable installation of steel main caps, designer, Hank Nordstrom, attributes the success of Turnited’s Blockliner to its robustness and to its fine adjustment capabilities. Instead of selecting a smaller diameter bar in the hope of align-boring the main journals and caps and the camshaft tunnel, he elected to use a 2-inch diameter hardened, precision-ground bar that is dedicated solely to the task of align-boring the mains. Now a new upgrade for align-boring the cam tunnel, which is referenced from the main saddles has appeared. “I was committed to building a high quality rigid machine,” says Nordstrom, “with adjustable spherical bearing and mill-mounted to conserve floor space and not be encumbered by bridge supports or steady rests.” The Blockliner, which can be used on all V8 engine blocks of US origin, also features a unique micro-feed tool holder and adjustable reference plates attached to each end of the block. For US interest: call MWA Machine Company’s Marvin Wood at (800) 877-2393 or reach him at Marvin@MWAmachine.com to find out more about Turnited’s Blockliner For Australian interest: contact Hank Nordstrom direct at: +46 (232) 3011 or reach him by e-mail at info@Blockliner.com (Dealer enquiries...
Handy tuning tips for modular carburetors

Handy tuning tips for modular carburetors

Part 1 of 2 By Sam Logan Engines produce vacuum and over the past 120 years engineers have contrived ingenious ways to harness its power to the engine’s induction system. Through a labyrinth of small-bore drillings in the carburetor, the vacuum draws a potent mixture of air and fuel. So formidable is the mixture, it empowers naturally aspirated full-bodied 500cu in race cars to speeds in excess of 213mph in a distance no greater than 1,320 feet! Although its fumes ignite, gasoline won’t burn and produce energy in an internal combustion engine in its liquid form. Instead it needs to be emulsified (mixed with air), atomized, (separated into fine particles) vaporized (transformed to a gaseous state) and compressed in order for it to produce energy. The carburetor takes responsibility for the emulsification and the atomization processes while the vaporization occurs in the induction tracts. In addition, the carburetor must meet the air-fuel ratio requirements of the engine.To emulsify the air and fuel, small-bore drillings are placed in the air entries on the top of the carburetor. They are known as air bleeds. The emulsified mixture is then drawn rapidly through a multitude of small passageways and distributed into the fast moving air stream in the carburetor’s throttle bores for atomization. It is discharged through a dozen small ports, three in each throttle bore. They are known as idle, transfer slot, and boost venturi. The idle discharge ports and transfer slots are located in the throttle bores of the base plate and draw their source of fuel from the fuel bowls via the carburetor’s idle wells. The boost venturii and...