Engine Masters Challenge and Kaase’s bold proposition for 2016

Engine Masters Challenge and Kaase’s bold proposition for 2016

By Alfie Bilk: Winder Georgia: Jon Kaase, winner of Thursday’s Vintage class in this year’s Engine Masters Challenge at the University of Northwestern  Ohio in Lima, has proposed that the perennial three top performing teams, Bischoff Engine Services, School of Automotive Machinists and Jon Kaase Racing Engines, should be sequestered in the same class and all three should compete using the same engine make and model. In so doing, engine shops could enter the contest without butting heads with them—unless they wanted to—and “to make it more interesting,” said Kaase, “we should consider selecting an engine that’s unknown to us—maybe a Flathead V8 or a Buick or similar.” In this year’s EMC, rules had been dramatically altered to the delight of some and the disquiet of others. In the changes, the Challenge had been elevated from a one-class contest, where winner took all, to include five classes—one for each day of competition. Accordingly, Monday was devoted to the Mopar Hemi; Tuesday, Spec Small-Block; Wednesday, GM LS; Thursday, Vintage; and Friday, Big-block. Needless to say, the advantage of the new rules soon became obvious: about half of the competitors entered were rewarded with money—$12,000 and $3,000 for each winner and each runner-up respectively. Also, peak horsepower and peak torque were worth a further $2,000; that is $1,000 for each category. In addition, with the increased number of winning engines as well as their broad diversity, the magazines could run significantly more feature articles about them than in the past. Hemi Mopar: Monday Bischoff Engine Services of Guildford, Indiana, won the Hemi class, which consisted of two late-model Hemis and two 426 Hemis....
Two imminent historic racing events: Daytona and Sebring

Two imminent historic racing events: Daytona and Sebring

By Martha Maglone:   HSR Classic 24-Hour at Daytona International Speedway, Nov. 12-15 Entry list includes 174 race cars and 300 drivers confirmed. Entered teams represent 15 countries from four Continents. Additional racing legends, current stars and historic racing drivers from around the world expected to attend. Last year’s inaugural event has been nominated for Motorsport Event of the Year.       Sebring Historics December 3-6 The Sebring Historics are the season finale for HSR and as such provide great racing at Florida’s historic road race track. Night races, a 4-hour enduro as well as HSR’s season-ending award banquet are just a few of the...
Performance fix for mild-mannered engines

Performance fix for mild-mannered engines

By Sam Logan: Grand Rapids, Michigan – TorqStorm’s new billet aluminum centrifugal supercharger is not designed for racing use. Instead its purpose is to increase a stock engine’s power output by an average of 40 percent. Presented with a life-time warranty, its gearbox and bearing housing are constructed of 6061-T6 billet aluminum alloy. It functions by blowing through a fuel-injection throttle body or carburetor. Engineered and supplied in convenient engine kits, these include a blow-through bonnet and the plumbing materials that connect it to the supercharger as well as all necessary mounting hardware. Neither fuel system plumbing nor carburetor or throttle body is included. Flowing sufficient air to support 700+hp, the TorqStorm unit employs ceramic bearings, tool steel straight-cut gears and a billet compressor wheel in the style of a turbo impeller. An adjustable belt tensioner is also included as is a useful V-band clamping arrangement that allows rotation of the cast aluminum compressor cover and thus easy routing of the boosted air to the bonnet or intercooler. Available in natural alloy or black anodized or with a micro-polished finish, TorqStorm charger kits feature their own self-contained oil supply further simplifying installation and eliminating the need for oil feed lines. Finally, TorqStorm provides a vacuum-controlled blow-off valve, which serves a dual purpose. First, it only allows boost to occur above light throttle; that is when vacuum falls to a preset level. It also releases excessive boost pressures, which prevents damage to the system when the throttle suddenly closes on deceleration. Prices start at $2,800 For more information contact: TorqStorm 3001 Madison SE, Wyoming, Michigan 49548 Telephone (616) 706-5580 or...
Barber’s 11th Vintage Motorcycle Festival:

Barber’s 11th Vintage Motorcycle Festival:

How to raise your spirits when in Alabama – By Fergus Oglivy: What did they enjoy most? Commemorating its eleventh anniversary, the three-day Barber Vintage Festival, October 9-11, drew its largest crowd yet, almost 70,000 attendees. This historic motorcycle extravaganza has been the principal power in historic and vintage motorcycle matters for over a decade. Located at George Barber’s magnificent 830-acre parkland estate at Leeds near Birmingham, Alabama, it is a treasured preserve for enthusiasts, collectors and racers. Before its creation, few of us had realized just how great the void it would fill. In 2014 the exquisite Barber Motorsport Park and Museum became the number one tourist attraction in Birmingham. The museum contains the world’s largest motorcycle collection—in excess of 1,475 examples. In addition, it is widely recognized for its array of historic Lotus race cars and other rare vehicles, not to mention its research library that contains over 7,000 motorcycle books. For this year’s Festival, the weekend’s activities included legal advice from motorcycle accident lawsuit massachusetts, celebration of John Britten and his racing motorcycles, which were featured in wonderful track parades each day. One of the five bikes in action was ridden by Barber’s chief restoration specialist and former Matchless G50 racer, Chuck Huneycutt. “These are my lucky leathers,” he chuckled, which didn’t easily explain their numerous scuff marks, evidence of dubious track encounters! It is twenty years since Britten, the acclaimed New Zealander, died of cancer at the premature age of 45. His wife, Kirsteen, and family as well as notable Britten riders, Andrew Stroud and Stephen Briggs and other team members, had all journeyed to...
Obituary: Engine builder and racer Lamar Walden dies at 74

Obituary: Engine builder and racer Lamar Walden dies at 74

By Victor Moore: Lamar Walden was diagnosed with colon cancer in September 2012. He had been given six months to live when a further spot was discovered on his liver. He subsequently attended the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and fought the insidious disease bravely for 36 months before succumbing to its malignant side effects on August 28, 2015. His family believes harsh chemotherapy sessions in Atlanta proved to be unpromising territory and may have hastened his end. He was 74 years of age. Lamar Walden was a successful engine builder, who had specialized in the Chevrolet 409 power unit since its inception in the early 1960s. He oversaw business growth include other GM performance engines, particularly the LS, as well as an accomplished restoration service. He was the only person to receive three COPO Camaros from the factory, all of which are now on display in Rick Hendrick’s museum in North Carolina. Born in 1941 in Flintstone, Georgia, a mountainous region twelve miles south of Chattanooga, Lamar was the youngest but one of his six siblings—four brothers and two sisters. His father was a house builder but neither he nor any of his siblings had interests in auto racing. In 1967 Lamar established one of the first franchises for Honest Charlie. Based in Marietta, an affluent suburb of Atlanta, it was one of the first speed shops in Georgia. The following year he sold the building and the franchise and purchased R&L Automotive in Steve Street, Doraville, Georgia. There he established Lamar Walden Automotive, which has remained at this location since. Lamar was at...
The allure of Goodwood

The allure of Goodwood

By Bertie Scott Brown: When you first stand at Goodwood’s St. Mary’s corner, a fast, sweeping left hander, and race cars explode into view, you completely forget everything—your camera settings, your notes, the name of the race—every rational thought can vanish except one: this is living! An enticing step back in time, the annual Goodwood Revival is the world’s largest historic motor racing event. Staged every September since 1998, the venue is located near Chichester, a West Sussex cathedral city situated near England’s Southeast coast. Each year the Revival introduces an unfailingly unique experience to a sellout crowd of nearly 150,000. They attend in period clothing, marvel at the world’s most enchanting motor cars, bikes, and planes and revel in its inviting atmosphere. It remains the only international motor sport venue that has been preserved in its original form. Goodwood commemorates a racing era that began in 1948 and ended in 1966. During the second German war, the grounds had served as a Battle of Britain airfield and when the RAF closed the base after the war, landowner Freddie March, grandfather to current owner Earl of March, converted the perimeter road into a racing circuit. This year’s event took place on September 11-13 and included 15 races for cars and motorcycles that had been constructed up to and including the year of 1966. A special tribute to motor sport legend Bruce McLaren was laid on as was a celebration of the 50th anniversary of Shelby’s Daytona Coupe. Also, Sir Jackie Stewart demonstrated the BRM P261 in which he won the Italian F1 GP exactly 50 years ago to the...