How to adjust a carburetor choke

How to adjust a carburetor choke

New Jersey native Ray Bohacz is a respected engine builder. Though he relished the challenge of preparing race-winning engines, his earliest memories were linked to farming and its many aspects—particularly its mechanics. Recently he has combined these interests by demonstrating the value of short, technical trouble-solving videos. No doubt most of us have encountered problems with carburetor chokes, so watch for Ray’s good...
Joe Hornick and his unusual service:

Joe Hornick and his unusual service:

America’s first help line for race engine builders. By Victor Moore: “He’s been an absolute master at soaking up knowledge, which has been a great help to us. He applies it intelligently and explains it in simple terms,” says John Force’s Funny Car crew chief Jimmy Prock. In our racing world, from Sportsman level to F1, it is those with acutely sharp brain power that gain the decisive edge. Though not always recognized by the public at large, top teams know them, know their capacities and know they are indispensible. Joe Hornick is one such and like a rare trumpeter swan, when he’s in full flight his capabilities are something to see. “As an engineer, he is the best I’ve known,” says race engine builder Jack Cornett. “I first met him in 2011 and hired him initially as a consultant to unravel mysteries within our valve train assemblies. It didn’t take him long.”     Hornick, who grew up in Madison, Minnesota gained an aptitude for the skills required to develop advanced racing engines. His technique was mostly conventional: endless research and careful analyses. More unconventional, however, has been his embrace of all types of internal combustion engine development from nitro methane to alcohol, gasoline, to diesel, from drag racing to oval track—both asphalt and dirt, he even advises on and develops engine systems for marathon boat racing. He learns from them all. Says Richie Gilmore of ECR’s engine shop (Richard Childress Racing) in North Carolina: “It’s the extensiveness of his experience with racing engines that sets him apart. There are very few individuals like him. When NASCAR adopted...
New dates: ididit’s car show & open house

New dates: ididit’s car show & open house

The ididit Car Show & Open House, set at the company’s facility in the Michigan Great Lakes Region, is changing dates seeking better weather. Michigan weather isn’t always as consistent as the quality of vehicles on display, according to the company. Originally slated for the first week in October, ididit’s Car Show & Open House has weathered snow, rain and cold temperatures in recent years. In order to dodge the weather, the company decided to move this year’s car show to Sep. 16. Says ididit’s Megan Lunsford: “The date for the 2017 car show may have changed, but we will continue to showcase the best custom cars from the region, as well as provide our neighbors a chance to tour our manufacturing facility and win great prizes. We are proud to be an integral part of the Tecumseh community and our annual car show and open house is a way for us to show our gratitude to the place we call home.” Admission to ididit’s 2017 Car Show & Open House is free to all and will feature the car show, vendor exhibits, and giveaways. Registration (click here) for the 2017 ididit Car Show & Open House opens in...
Partial deliveries of pulley/belt combinations barely adequate

Partial deliveries of pulley/belt combinations barely adequate

How to do it better and how some road racers could raise their game. By Alfie Bilk: For the adept machinist, there’s no miraculous skill required to make adequate custom pulleys. What’s much more useful, however, particularly for engine building shops, is being able to acquire pulley combinations—both accurately made and durable, off-the-shelf and onto the engine quickly. Shelf-stock availability is an invaluable resource. Those prospects sound promising, right? They are. “Do you know how long it takes to organize this stuff in individual pieces,” says KRC’s Cody Haskins. “It’s longer than the average engine builder wants to mess with – and ‘half-shipped, half-on-back order’ is never a winning message.” This is not a new area for Haskins. Head of the Kennesaw, Georgia, power steering and pulley company, he has been one of the largest belt and pulley suppliers in the country for years. “We have on the shelf,” he assures, “any combination of pulleys and belts an engine builder could conceive.” Among pulley talking points are their diameters and provisions for additional pulleys. Notably, Haskins’s pulleys feature their distinctive R-lok innovation, a convenient pulley interlocking mechanism. This means additional pulleys are stackable. Thus, adding a further pulley to the crank, for example, is straightforward. These are usually employed to drive an oil pump, or power steering pump, or alternator. Common crank pulley diameters include 2.5in., 2.75in., 3in., and 3.5in. Of course, manufacturing a vast range of pulleys to form dozens of combinations is bound to disappoint without an equal number of drive belt types to complete the systems. Belt types include HTD, 6-rib serpentine belts and even V-belts. HTD...
How to add 5hp to the race engine throughout the rev range:

How to add 5hp to the race engine throughout the rev range:

Each generation of induction technology continually evolves; here is the latest. Measuring two inches deep, Mike Androwick of Mike’s Racing Heads has introduced a new lightweight four-hole tapered spacer to suit all 4150-style mounting flanges. It accommodates a wide range of competition engines. It is also said to fulfill the higher expectations of Dirt Late Model racers. Using the power of big-block modified racing engines as his datum, Androwick explains that this new tapered spacer generates a further five horsepower when tested against the most competitive spacers he could find. Importantly, the internal air flow surfaces are formed by pronounced small, sharp steps, giving the appearance of multiple tiny terraces. These terraces act as anti-reversion aids, resisting reverse airflow initiated when the valves close and fast-moving airflow is momentarily brought to an abrupt halt. At the spacer’s internal center, a further anti-reversion measure takes the form of a flat 1/2in square diamond-shaped pedestal. These one-way resistance measures attempt to limit the travel of reverse airflow—particularly its detrimental effects should it reach the carburetor boosters. Available at a price of $200 and immediate shipping completes the picture. Source Mike’s Racing Heads Concord, North Carolina (704) 654-6079...
New circle track blocks and useful deck-height guides

New circle track blocks and useful deck-height guides

By Archie Bosman: Over the years most of us have toyed with the notion of acquiring a desirable engine or two and sometimes, foolishly, we’ve asked the question, “Which one would you recommend?” Of course the inevitable answer comes: “It depends on what you’re trying achieve.” Often that answer leads us to even more uncertainty than when the conversation began. And worse, insiders would often start blustering on at great length about displacements, bore and stroke specs, connecting rod lengths, intake valve sizes and so on, leaving the average enthusiast looking on in bewilderment. To bring some simple logic to the complexities of this topic, examining deck heights is probably the best starting point, for everything else seems to be determined by it. And since World Products is currently engaged in the introduction of a range of new engine blocks it seemed an excellent time to find out…why so many? Though their latest replacement range of four engine blocks is designated for Fords, most of the fundamentals that follow apply to any range of engine blocks regardless of their origins. To begin with, deck heights are measured from the crankshaft centerline to the block deck. Usually this measurement is captured by some form of dial gauge caliper. Here the engine builder uses a steel ball as an aid to obtain an accurate reading. Then he deducts the diameter of the ball and adds half the crank mains journal diameter. On a Kaase Boss Nine engine, for example, the diameter of the mains journal is 3.193in. Therefore, to establish the block deck height he takes his dial gauge measurement, subtracts...