Double your disc for double your grab

Double your disc for double your grab

Here’s a for instance for you. You’re sitting in your car at a red light, your foot pressing the clutch pedal firmly against the floor. You plan to annihilate the tires on your car as soon as the light turns green. You know your car can do it; you’ve got a turbocharger, a performance tune, and a set of gears to make it all happen. As soon as the light goes green, you side-step the clutch and start your smoke show. But, something doesn’t seem right. Read Randy Bolig’s article in Mopar Muscle magazine on Ram’s performance clutch upgrade on a Dodge...
K1 introduces new crankshafts and connecting rods for GM LS engines

K1 introduces new crankshafts and connecting rods for GM LS engines

Written by Titus Bloom: LS cranks: pre-balanced to 1800g bob weight & with 1,000+hp capability Precisely ground & lightened rod journals with straight-shot oiling LS rods: Weight variance limited to +/- 2 grams across each set Mentor, Ohio: Forged from 4340, the tough, shock and impact resistant alloy steel, K1 Technologies has introduced a new range of high-performance crankshafts and H-beam connecting rods for racing and high performance LS engines. Designed to cope with 1,000+hp, K1’s new series of cranks and rods are ideal for street and custom rods, Muscle cars and performance trucks as well as road race and Sportsman drag race cars. K1’s forged crankshafts feature rifle-drilled mains, large journal radii and straight-shot journal oiling. Perhaps more importantly they are distinguished by precision-ground journals. Attaining meticulousness can be time consuming To avoid tapered journals the entire diameter of each journal, both main and rod, is subjected to concentricity checks traced on a co-ordinate measuring machine and finished to 0.0001in. In addition, to ease engine builder balancing obligations, the cranks are pre-balanced to 1,800 gram bob weight. For lightening purposes, two non-intersecting holes, 1 inch in diameter and angled at 25 degrees, are drilled into each end of each rod journal. To accommodate after-market harmonic balancers, a keyway is added to the crank snout. More appealing still is cost. At $835, K1’s crank is approximately 20 percent less expensive than comparable components. Connecting rods: In common with their crankshafts, K1’s new H-beam connecting rods for high-performance LS engines are made from the same pristine 4340 nickel-chrome-moly steel. But it’s the ambitions of their Ohio Design and Quality Control...

Overnight success for electrical wizard

By Titus Bloom, January 27, 2015 Overnight success for electrical wizard – after 40 years of toil At last year’s SEMA exhibition, in early November, the Chester, Pennsylvania electrical firm Ron Francis Wiring suddenly became the authority when it won the New Street Rod Product of the Year award for the striking innovation displayed in their new Blackbox relay system. Says company head Scott Bowers, “It greatly simplifies complex wiring, particularly in systems with numerous relays.” In fact, the Black box is not just limited to Street Rods, but serves equally well all hot rods, Muscle cars, race cars and others. Used for controlling power windows, door locks, fuel and water pumps and fans, this fully programmable apparatus controls 10 individual relayed circuits and costs $299.95. Four quick tips from Ron Francis Wiring 1) Mini fuses are better than ATO-ATC blade fuses because they have silver contacts that prevent them from adhering to the similar metal used in the fuse box. Introduced in 1992, they are widely available, including your local grocery store. 2) Do not solder unless you are experienced. If the solder wicks up the wire strands further than the connector itself, the strand wire becomes solid and can break under vibration. This is why solid core wire in not used on cars. 3) Always use a crash relay. It will immobilize the electric fuel pump in a collision. Fuel injection systems, carburetors, and broken fuel lines can discharge volatile gasoline in seconds, either onto the ground or in the car. 4) Remember, the nomenclature for wire gauges runs in reverse to common logic: the bigger the...