Why under-drive a pulley system?

Why under-drive a pulley system?

By Martha Maglone: If under-driving a pulley system robs less power from the engine, why doesn’t Concept One do it? “We don’t under drive the pulley system,” says Concept One’s Kevin Redd, “because we are more concerned with driveability than saving a couple horsepower. When you under-drive the pulley system you slow it down and as a result you can lose performance at low rpm and at idle. Reducing the pulley speeds can also have a detrimental effect on alternator charging as well as power steering performance and cooling efficiency. For these reasons we don’t under-drive our pulley...
Cure for uncomfortably high clutch pedal on late-model street cars

Cure for uncomfortably high clutch pedal on late-model street cars

By Sam Logan: Most late-model street vehicles use an internal hydraulic clutch release bearing, sometimes called a concentric slave cylinder (CSC). Yet, unfathomably, many of them suffer from clutch engagement high on the pedal travel. For most drivers, this is not comfortable. Conveniently, Ram Clutches has introduced a pedal-height adjuster, which is situated inline between the hydraulic master cylinder and the slave cylinder. It is in effect, an accumulator in which a piston and spring are housed. When the adjustment screw is turned in to its fullest extent, the piston cannot move and the adjuster is bypassed. In fact, this is the condition in which the system should be re-bled. As the adjustment screw is turned out and the pedal depressed, the fluid flows into the adjuster and pushes the piston back. Once the cylinder is full, the remaining fluid is routed to the hydraulic bearing. This essentially introduces free-play to the pedal travel and lowers the point where the clutch engages, allowing the driver to adjust the pedal to the most comfortable driving position. A lower pedal also quickens clutch response. A bonus feature of this adjuster is its ability to control the travel distance of the release bearing. This prevents over-travel of the clutch fingers, which can lead to clutch malfunction at higher engine RPM. Applying the pedal-height adjuster’s resourcefulness to the competition clutch Also worth noting, original equipment manufacturers use pre-loaded release bearings that are in constant contact with the clutch’s diaphragm fingers while competition-style bearing makers do not. By contrast they seek maximum clutch clamping force and, therefore, require some free-play between the clutch release...
Obituary: Remembering Michael Giannone

Obituary: Remembering Michael Giannone

By Victor Moore: Michael Giannone founder and owner of the respected competition connecting rod company MGP, died on March 11 following a short period of illness. He was just 60. Born in Los Angeles, California, Michael, an enlightened and refined man was formerly part of GRP but left to form MGP in Colorado Springs in the mid-nineteen-nineties. His twenty-five year career had been devoted to pioneering designs and production of competition aluminum connecting rods and made many contributions to their development, including the ingenious concentric locking pattern. In fact, he loved what he did and thrived on presenting a solution for every problem. As many of us can testify when we saw him at the PRI show in Indianapolis in December 2014, he showed no symptoms of illness. “He looked fine,” says his nineteen-year old son, Anthony. ” When he entered hospital on February 19, they thought he had pneumonia. And for two weeks he looked and behaved like the guy we knew so well—smart and engaging—but when they investigated further they found cancer, which was so aggressive they were powerless to save him.” The cancer, which remains unidentified to the family so far, metastasized in his lungs but wasn’t lung cancer. Happily, for the family it is business as usual and Anthony, who has been working in the connecting rod factory since he was 14, has taken over the operation. “Though the events have been tragic,” he said, “I knew enough on the production side to keep the business running, so that part wasn’t such a huge hit.” Michael Giannone, who ardently navigated the seas of our choppy...