Androwick extends oval track influence and returns to NHRA Pro Stock

By Fergus Ogilvy Photography by Moore Good Ink, April 22, 2014 Concord, North Carolina: Mike Androwick of Mike’s Racing Heads has confirmed his return to NHRA Pro Stock although he hasn’t revealed which team. “We’ve already brought some new engine power to their program, but Pro Stock is hard-fought competition at best and, though important, engine power is only one element of a complex process.” Starting in the early 1980s as a cylinder head porter for Brandywine Cylinder Heads, Androwick has enjoyed a long career designing and developing racing heads. He honed his Competition Eliminator skills at Nicken’s in Houston, Texas and at Lingenfelter’s in Decatur, Indiana, and his Pro Stock involvement dates back to the days of Joe Lepone, before turning his hand to self-employment when he formed Mike’s Racing Heads in West Chester, Pennsylvania in 1989. Creating new designs that excel takes more than merely repeating what came before—clear, innovative thinking is the more effective substitute. After producing several successful formulas and remaining solvent for 11 years as the captain of his own ship, he was offered a position by Dart in 2000, which included working on special projects and managing their CNC-machining department. Later, in 2004, he distinguished himself when he helped hoist Larry Morgan’s race efforts to the top four of the NHRA Pro Stock Championship. Qualifying in every round, the 2004 season had been their best since 1993. What happens if you apply Pro Stock technology to oval track? Aided by his son Michael, Androwick re-opened Mike’s Racing Heads in Concord, North Carolina in 2007. Inevitably, they soon made their mark in the northeast...
Altronics latest Powerlite lithium batteries

Altronics latest Powerlite lithium batteries

Promoting lightness, boundless energy and agreeable cost savings By Alfie Bilk, April 24, 2014 Schaumburg, Illinois:  The average weight of a lead-acid or AGM battery in a Sportsman drag race car is believed to be around 37lbs or heavier. In contrast Altronics’ new Powerlite lithium battery with 900 cold-cranking amps weighs 7lbs. Available with 12 or 16 volts, the larger Powerlite 1,050 amp unit weighs 8lbs and the 1,200 amp 9lbs. Further, for large high-compression motors Altronics has just released their 16 volt 920SS series. Powerlite possess the latest technology, have maximum output, and are extremely light. Importantly, their energy empowers them to bump the motor with the starter when checking valve springs, valve lash, and clutch settings without fear of damaging the electronics. Of course the 16-volt option provides faster cranking, runs pumps, fans and nitrous solenoids more efficiently, and always provides adequate ignition with sufficient voltage for peak starting. Measuring 9.7 x 3.8 x 8.2in, Altronics’ Fred Bartoli says the Powerlite charges much faster than the typical lead-acid or AGM battery and has a 10-year life expectancy. A “Green” product, the Powerlite range of lithium batteries is environmentally safe, covered by the RoHS (Restriction of Hazardous Substances) directive, which means the batteries are biodegradable and therefore land-fill-safe. To mount the Powerlite range of batteries, lightweight billet aluminum battery frames are available, which weight 1lb and cost $149.99. And speaking of price Altronics’ Fred Bartoli declares Powerlite offers a decisive edge on pricing: Powerlite 900 amp lithium battery with 15 amp charger $999.99 Powerlite 1,050 amp lithium battery with 15 amp charger $1,199.99 Powerlite 1,200 amp lithium battery...

Racing rocker arm virtuoso Wild Wilfred goes home

By Sam Logan Photography by Moore Good Ink, April 15, 2014 Dawsonville, Georgia: How is it that the man who makes the finest racing rocker arms—five to six hundred sets per year—is virtually unknown? His valve train parts, which are shipped in unmarked boxes, flow from his modest manufacturing facility in north Georgia about fifty miles north of Atlanta. They carry the promise of winning. The shop, which is not open to the public is also unmarked and sits among the evergreen scenery and the burnished magnolia at the end of a neat concrete drive behind a gated entrance. In the shop, customers’ names are rarely mentioned. Indeed this policy of discretion is understandable as professional racing teams work hard to gain an advantage and it’s in their interests and those who serve them to remain tight-lipped. Racing, particularly the kind where engine power predominates, requires secrecy and Wilfred Boutilier of WW Engineering knows how to play the game. In nineteen-sixty-five Wild Wilfred Boutilier now 76-years-old left his Nova Scotia homeland, pursuing an ardor for NHRA drag racing. In the nineteen-seventies he competed in Pro Comp Alcohol Funny car, winning at Englishtown in 1974 and again at the Fall Nationals in Seattle, Washington a year later. Boutilier continued racing though not from the confines of a Funny Car. He was the first to create billet heads for Donovan blocks. He also produced them for Lamar Walden’s Chevrolet 409s. The finest rocker arms you’ve never heard of: Almost thirty years ago Boutilier began developing competition rocker arms from billet aluminum. Why would he do that? Why would he not use...

The best of this year’s Walter Mitty:

By Martha Maglone Photography by Moore Good Ink, April 28, 2014 Road Atlanta race circuit is the spiritual home of the Walter Mitty. An annual adventure, it has been this way since the mid-1970s, when a group of Atlanta enthusiasts organized an occasion that is now the largest and oldest event for Historic race cars on the East Coast. Over the years the “Mitty” has become as much a state of mind, pardon the pun, as a race, and as you drive through north Georgia its approaching awareness puts you in the atmosphere that can only be the Walter Mitty. A favorite point in the season, it’s a reward for those who enjoy historically interesting racing cars. In our youth we recall with much affection the stirring lyrics of Roy Orbison but in spring none more so than, “Golden days that never end,” for they are rarely more appropriate than in the northern reaches of Georgia. From April 20 to May 20 these golden days present mornings that are cool and crisp and bright, the days are warm, the humidity low, and the azalea and mountain laurel stunning. And into this mix you add the 37th successive running of the Walter Mitty. Organized by HSR (Historic Sportscar Racing) the Walter Mitty is the third event of their 2014 seven-race series. This year’s order began in mid-February at the Palm Beach International Raceway, visiting Sebring one month later. Following the Mitty, racing resumes at Mid-Ohio in September 19-21 followed by events at Savannah, Daytona and Sebring in October, November and December respectively. Sponsored by Classic Motorsports magazine and Hagerty, the insurance...