The Walter Mitty: For those who cherish Historic race cars in action it's irresistible

Written by Moore Good Ink Braselton, GA: Each year the Historic Sportscar Racing association (HSR) organizes the largest and oldest event for Historic race cars on the East Coast. It’s called the Walter Mitty and it takes place at Road Atlanta, usually in late April. Founded by a group of Atlanta‐area racing devotees in the mid-1970s, the Mitty is a celebration of sports and racing cars from the 1950s through the Can-Am years to more recent times. This year’s event, the Classic Motorsports 37th Mitty, took place on April 26-28, and had appointed former driver and now F1 television commentator for NBC David Hobbs as its Grand Master. Ed Pink Racing Engines’ proprietor, the upbeat Tom Malloy reclining in his folding chair under his transporter awning said, “Come on in and take a look at my McLaren M8E, if you’d like.” Here in this series of images taken on Friday in the paddock and on the track are a few of the memorable machines in action and on display at this year’s event. They begin with Tom Malloy’s McLaren and his Eagle followed by a Porsche 917K, a model with a towering presence in historic Sportscar racing. This iconic machine brought Porsche its first 24 hours of Le Mans sports car victory in 1970 and triumphed again in ’71. David Hinton’s Heritage Motorsports of Clearwater, Florida arrived with a remarkable car count of 26 machines. These included a gaggle of acclaimed, rare and lovely Cam-Am race cars ably cared for by the esteemed Billy...

Full house for Summit’s big day at McDonough store

Written by Moore Good Ink McDonough GA: Each year from April 20 to May 20, before the summer heat settles in, north Georgia presents itself as the ideal venue for event planning. It is during this time, when the azalea and the dogwood preparing for their first flush of bloom and the magnolia presents its exquisite burnished, dark green leaf, that Summit Racing holds its open house at its McDonough branch, located at Junction 216 on the I-75 just south of Atlanta. And so it was on April 20, one month from the first day of spring, when Summit’s Ray Tatko and his team greeted their guests under warm, blue skies at their McDonough store. For the third successive year, they had invited dozens of manufacturers to display their wares in the marquee and hundreds of enthusiasts presented their machines in the parking lot. These included the 1967 Pro Street Camaro of Ram Clutches’ Mike Norcia, a car that has been in his family for decades and a delightful 1957 Ford Custom sporting a Kaase Boss Nine. The 1967 Pro Street Camaro of Ram Clutches’ Mike Norcia, a car that has been in his family for decades “The objective of our McDonough store, which we opened in 2006,” said Summit’s Gene Qualls, “is to promote faster deliveries in the southeast and to engage enthusiasts in the...

New calibration kit for 750 Street Demon carburetors

Written by Moore Good Ink On April 24, the Street Demon production line issued its first 750 Street Demon carburetors. In a week’s time the assembly cells will be expanded, allowing production volumes to double. In the meantime details of a calibration kit for the new carburetor have emerged. • Allows fuel flow rates to be adjusted below or above production calibrations • Provides jets, metering rods for fine tuning, and springs for perfect idle • Resolves tuning troubles caused by altitude, cams, high compression, etc. • Banishes eye-watering exhaust fumes for sunnier disposition Dawsonville, GA: Demon Carburetion’s calibration kit for the new 750 Street Demon facilitates changes to the carburetor’s fuel flow rates. Via an assortment of metering rods, primary and secondary jets, and piston springs, fuel flow rates can be adjusted above and below the production calibrations. Thus the carburetor performs richer or leaner—you can calibrate it to the exact air-fuel ratios for any specific engine or condition. Commonly fuel flow alterations are initiated by changes in altitude, camshaft, higher compression ratios, or engine displacement—and sometimes by unequal distribution from an intake manifold at different engine speeds. Generally, metering rods are changed to adjust air-fuel ratios in finer increments while jets are changed to affect larger increments. In summary, the tuning kit is useful for correcting hesitation troubles or eye-watering exhaust fumes or puffs of smoke under acceleration. At the chassis dynamometer it quickly enables the tuner to accomplish maximum efficiency. All components in the Demon calibration kit are supplied in pairs and all jets and needles are stamped for easy identification. Now available under part number...

Spin it up! The final frontier in engine testing

Written by Ray T. Bohacz Jesel, one of the best competition valve train specialists to emerge in the past thirty years, owes much of its supremacy to extensive developing and testing of its competition parts. The test machine is a SpinTron. The parts being tested are principally roller tappets and rocker arms. “Ten or twelve years ago when I first pressed the SpinTron into action,” says Danny Jesel, “my immediate response was one of shock—the racket it generated was incredible! I just wasn’t expecting the opening and closing of two valves to be so loud, and initially I thought something was broken.” Once Danny Jesel became accustomed to the commotion, his next challenge was grappling with the phenomenon known as lofting. Lofting occurs when engine speeds increase, usually above 4,000rpm, causing the tappet and valve train components to lose contact with the camshaft each revolution. As a result the valves remain open much longer than camshaft designers had intended. Some race engine developers call it “controlled valve float.” Read the entire story as it appeared in Extreme magazine here...

Ariel Atom brings new thrills to Sportsman road racing

Written by Moore Good Ink Alton, VA: Probably the most significant milestone in the past two years for Sportsman road racers, those who pay their own bills, is the introduction of the Spec Race Atom (SRA). Derived from the popular Ariel Atom 3 supercar, the SRA distinguishes itself in several extraordinary ways, not least by its unusual exoskeleton form. But its mesmerizingly rapid acceleration and its remarkable cornering power are attributes that need to be explored urgently. Weighing 1315lbs, the SRA is extraordinarily light and having its transversely mounted engine and transmission positioned over the rear wheels ensures massive traction. In steady-state cornering, the SRA generates remarkable g-forces, measuring 1.7 to 1.8g, and its power-to-weight ratio exceeds that of many modern supercars. No wonder former NHRA Top Fuel champion Eddie Hill exclaimed, “I wish I had discovered road racing an Atom sooner.” And it is easy to see why—there are precious few vehicles that can dominate in this fashion. Constructed by TMI AutoTech at Virginia International Raceway, the SRA is powered by a 230hp naturally aspirated 2.4 liter 4-cylinder Honda engine. Constructed entirely by TMI AutoTech,Inc. at their base at Virginia International Raceway, the SRA accommodates drivers from 5ft 2in to 6ft 7in. It is powered by a naturally aspirated 2.4 liter 4-cylinder Honda engine, which generates 230hp at 6,500rpm and makes peak torque at 3,500rpm. When the SRA was introduced, orders were secured for forty-five cars almost immediately. Initially the spec-racing program was planned for a 10-race series in the East, at VIR, but demand sparked another series in the West, at Spring Mountain Motorsports Ranch, Pahrump near Las...
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