Mighty Demon 850 annular carburetor for big-blocks and big small-blocks

By Bertie S. Brown: Few carburetors were courted as much as the Race Demons in the late nineties and in the early part of this century. They had the appearance and heritage and, to some, bewildering technology. But above all else they had performance. Now an 850 annular is available and it represents a significant step forward, not least because Race Demons are unavailable. For high performance big-blocks and big small-blocks here is Demon Carburetion’s 850 annular carburetor. Bowling Green KY: Demon Carburetion has made available an 850cfm carburetor with annular boosters for high performing big-block engines and large displacement or high-revving small blocks. Prepared with 1.560in venturii and intended to operate with 425 to 540cu in engines with camshaft duration of 240-plus at 0.050in valve opening, this carburetor demonstrates its talents in street car use, bracket racing, and heads-up class racing. With mechanically operated secondary throttles and equipped with removable air bleeds and idle-feed restrictors, it possesses all the features of the former Race Demon with the exception of removable emulsion bleeds and boosters. The removable idle-feed restrictors are particularly helpful for perfecting the idle mixture on individual engine combinations—useful with differing camshafts, cylinder heads, and intakes. For example, if the throttle plates are adjusted to the correct position yet the idle mixture is too lean or too rich and cannot be remedied by ignition timing, simply replace the idle-feed restrictors. Years ago Demon envisioned the possibility of increasing idle speed without disturbing the throttle plates from their correct position. The ingenious concept involved inserting a screwdriver in the air cleaner stud hole and making an adjustment. This...

Lifting the Shroud: Jon Kaase’s Canted-valve P-38 Windsor Cylinder Heads Aims For Better Cylinder Filling

by Ro McGonegal Engine philosopher Jon Kaase (Jon Kaase Racing Engines, Winder, Georgia) had an idea, an idea that nagged. For too many years, he’d watched the ubiquitous 302 amass part upon improved part, but observed nary a deviation from the original cylinder head configuration. He thought he could produce cylinder head castings that looked like ordinary Windsor 302/351 parts on the outside but inside would be entirely different from the original blueprint. Being a racer, he knew the value of stealth. But more importantly, being an engine builder he knew the prime advantages of canting the valves to open towards the center of the cylinders and so mitigate the natural shrouding effect of the cylinder wall. Read the entire story as it appeared in Street Fords...