Cooling fix for power steering systems and automatic transmissions

Cooling fix for power steering systems and automatic transmissions


Kennesaw, GA: KRC believes they have a new contender for fluid-cooling honors.

Earlier this year they expanded their horizons when they introduced a promising new power steering fluid that withstands repeated high temperature usage. Now they are launching a new all-aluminum furnace-brazed fluid cooler for power steering systems and automatic transmissions. It promises to demonstrate impressive heat dissipation, presenting itself as 40 percent more effective than regular fin-tube or  spline-fin coolers.

Cooler-detail

Using internal micro fins and external serpentine fins—the prospect of gaining significantly greater cooling is possible

Combining micro fins with serpentine fins

Impressive heat dissipation can be elusive. But by channeling the fluid through multiple internal fins located within four flat-sided oval extrusions, KRC succeeded in reducing fluid temperatures by 22F degrees. The temperature difference is measure between fluid entering the inlet port and exiting the outlet port.

Furthermore, as the heat transfers through the micro fins and the extrusion walls, its dissipation is hastened when it reaches a dense maze of serpentine fins. Attached to the external surfaces by a technology known as furnace brazing the serpentine fins, though almost invisible to the naked eye are themselves festooned with a multitude of tiny louvered fins.

Serpentine fins, though almost invisible to the naked eye are themselves festooned with a multitude of tiny louvered fins

Serpentine fins, though almost invisible to the naked eye are themselves festooned with a multitude of tiny louvered fins

At the rear of the cooler a vertical plate runs its length with angled slots and the letters KRC notched out. Their objective, particularly the angled slots, is to create turbulence. The turbulence generates a negative pressure that disrupts the air flow, which further improves cooling performance. Importantly, the cooler exhibits minimum flow restriction, hence a minimum pressure-drop that further aids cooling performance.

How hot oil travels through a cooler without losing heat!

Oil, when heated, builds an insulation layer between the internal surface of the tube and the prevailing oil flow like a boundary layer. In addition, the majority of the oil flowing in the middle of a conventional round tube remains un-cooled—parallel layers have different relative velocities. In sharp contrast, the inner micro fins in KRC’s flat-sided extrusion scrub or upset the oil’s laminar flow, preventing it from building an insulated wall.

Source:

KRC Power
(770) 422-5135
www.KRCpower.com

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