First new billet flywheels for V6 Mustangs: aluminum and steel replacements for cast iron originals

Written by Moore Good Ink • Billet steel flywheels are stronger than cast iron and safer at high rpm • They also function better than cast iron when used with modern friction materials • Billet aluminum flywheels are light: they accelerate and decelerate faster • Blanchard-ground flywheels are free of clutch snatch, chatter, and run-out • Blanchard grinding ensures the flywheel is mounted parallel to the crank flange • Billet aluminum flywheels with robust 1/4in steel inserts avoid distortion Columbia, SC: Ram has introduced a new range of billet aluminum and billet steel flywheels for V6 Mustangs from 1997 to 2004. The advantage of the billet steel over the original cast iron unit is that, though they weigh the same, around 32lbs, the billet steel unit is significantly stronger. Crucially, it remains free of stress cracks and, therefore, safe at high engine speeds and higher clutch clamping forces. In addition billet steel flywheels operate more effectively with modern high-performance clutch friction materials than do their cast-iron counterparts. In comparison, the aluminum flywheel has the decisive advantage of carrying minimal weight. In this case it rids itself of half its mass—tipping the scales at 16lbs. Lower mass means a lower moment of inertia, which translates to faster response—faster acceleration and deceleration as well as less wheel spin. Constructed from 6061-T6, Ram’s aluminum flywheels use 1/4in thick steel inserts to avoid distortion. To maintain their flatness the inserts, which mate with the clutch disc friction surfaces, are fastened to the flywheels by 18 rivets. To overcome clutch snatch or chatter and provide minimal run-out, these new flywheels are Blanchard-ground, contributing a...
Fuelling 1,377hp for the track and for the streets

Fuelling 1,377hp for the track and for the streets

Written by Moore Good Ink Cleveland, Ohio: Road-going cars that generate 1,377hp at the rear wheels leave a profound impression. Featured in the May 2012 issue of Hot Rod magazine, the definitive authority on hot rods, a story of Bryant Goldstone’s Chevelle appears. It tells of a 1970 model that leaves the lights in second gear on 11in tires, runs the quarter mile in 8.22 seconds at 167 miles per hour, and cruises for thousands of highway miles returning 11mpg. Three years ago when Goldstone (45) was preparing this car he presented Weldon with the challenge of providing enough fuel at full boost and a much lesser amount when cruising. These demands were only slightly complicated by a further request to run the Chevelle on race fuel and E85 if required. In the pump house: how the big pumps work. The system uses a Weldon controller (P/N 14000) and two Weldon fuel pumps (P/N 2345-A), a primary and a secondary. These units operate in conjunction with a Big Stuff3 ECU. Both Weldon pumps are in service even when the Chevelle is running on 92-93 octane pump fuel. However, when the engine is operating at less than 25 percent throttle opening, the ECU automatically directs the controller to disable the secondary pump and reduce the primary pump to run on a pulsed current only—much like a fuel injector. The pulsed current restricts the pump’s output and prevents the fuel from getting hot. Keeping the fuel cool protects against evaporation and vapors forming at the pump’s inlet port and the destructive effects of cavitation that follow. Reduced pump speeds also bring...

"If it doesn't live on the dyno pull it won't live on the salt"

Written by Moore Good Ink On its last visit to Bonneville, Duttweiler’s record-holding 300cu inch turbocharged small block ran 436mph in the Poteet & Main Speed Demon. “The advantage of Diamond pistons at high boost pressures,” said Ken Duttweiler, “is they don’t crack or bend-they are free of deflection concerns.” Earlier the astute Duttweiler had created a program that enables their dynamometer to assimilate four- to five-mile Bonneville passes at speeds in excess of 400mph. They run it up from 6,000 to 8,500rpm, assimilating each gear change, and when they reach full throttle in 5th gear with 30lb of boost the dyno runs for a further 1min and 10sec with power output at 1,900hp and an exhaust system glowing bright white hot. Says Diamond advocate Duttweiler, “If it doesn’t live on the dyno pull it won’t live on the...

RAM INTRODUCES BEST TOOL EVER DEVISED FOR ADJUSTING CLUTCH PEDAL HEIGHT

Written by Moore Good Ink Ram has pioneered a new clutch pedal adjuster (PN 78300) that not only corrects the pedal height of all aftermarket high performance clutch systems but also OEM systems. In addition it’s designed to function with any OEM or aftermarket hydraulic clutch system and eradicates all concerns associated with the over-travel of the release bearings. (Release Bearings with excessive travel can destroy the bearing or cause the clutch diaphragm to travel over center, resulting in high rpm engagement troubles) Compared with factory-style originals, most modern high performance aftermarket clutches require less travel to disengage. As a result, the pedal often sits higher than the enthusiast might desire; in fact, the factory pedal could often benefit from a slightly lower position. Available for immediate delivery and priced at $138.95, this new Ram HSA (Hydraulic System Adjuster) is easily installed and adjustable without lifting the car if the valve is mounted under the hood. Click here for printable catalog fact sheet.    For further infomation contact: RAM Clutches 201 Business Park Blvd. Columbia, SC 29203 Telephone (803) 788-6034...

John Urist wins his sixth NMRA Super Street Outlaw title

John Urist knows forced induction. Though the Albuquerque native is only thirty-two years of age, he formed Hellion Power Systems when he was twenty-three. He has been building and developing turbo and supercharger systems for a living since. “It was Arkansas engine builder Jim Kuntz who recommended I go with a Wilson throttle body for the 2006 race season. In fact, I also bought a Wilson elbow, a custom-ported intake manifold, and a D-fuel rail fuel injected conversion. When I received the parts, I was surprised at just how beautifully made Wilson’s stuff is-it’s second to none. “To maximize horsepower in an engine like mine, it is vital every cylinder receives identical air-fuel mixture. The task of distributing equal airflow through an intake system and into the cylinders of an engine is very difficult. I think Wilson stands alone in airflow research-they are one of the very few who really understands...
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