Give it the gas! Why gasoline may be a better choice for your next truck.

Give it the gas! Why gasoline may be a better choice for your next truck.

By: Ray T. Bohacz: As racers and enthusiasts, it is hard to not fall in love with a 900 lb-ft diesel pick-up truck; one that flattens the hills with the goose-neck trailer hitched on the back. But if you are contemplating the purchase of a new tow vehicle for your toys, it may be wise to take a look at today’s gasoline engines. I think their performance will surprise you. Diesel disadvantages The two major obstacles are the upfront cost and the complexity of the emission control systems. Order a diesel in a pick-up truck and you just added around $8,600.00 to the price over its gasoline counterpart. Would that money be spent better elsewhere? In most instances I believe so. What you receive with a diesel is a huge amount of torque over a gasoline engine. Torque is what moves the load. We all “buy” horsepower but “drive” torque. The diesel combustion process allows the cylinder pressure to remain more constant than that of a spark ignited engine. In addition, all pick-up truck diesels are turbocharged. This fills the cylinders with more air, tricking the engine into thinking that it is larger than it really is. Between the combustion characteristics and the forced induction, the diesel is a real torque monster. However, modern gasoline engines have become more powerful and are superior in performance to the diesels used in pick-up trucks just a few years back. Let’s look at a comparison of then and now: 1988 Diesel 1998 Diesel 2018 Gas Ford 188 HP/345 TQ 215 HP/425 TQ 385 HP/430 TQ Chevrolet 160 HP/285 TQ 215 HP/440 TQ...
Oil Leaks, Tuning Issues, and Proper Crankcase Ventilation

Oil Leaks, Tuning Issues, and Proper Crankcase Ventilation

By Gordon Young: Is improper control of blow-by gases in your crankcase causing problems in your engine?  If any of these questions below sound familiar, then read on. “Why does my engine leak oil?  I took care when fitting the gaskets and seals.” “Why do my valve covers persistently display oil around the breathers?” “Why does my car smell oily?” “Why can’t I perfect my idle tuning?” Imagine a small tailpipe constantly pumping combustion byproducts into your engine’s crankcase.  In effect, this is what is happening when your engine is running.  Blow-by gases entering the crankcase by leaking past the pistons and rings during the combustion process need proper evacuation.  If left unchecked, they cause numerous side effects, inducing engine problems that may seem unrelated. Side effect #1:  Crankcase pressure (“My engine leaks oil”) The job of the Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV) system is to remove blow-by gasses from the crankcase by vacuum and recirculate them via the intake manifold to be burned in the engine.  If the engine is producing blow-by gases faster than the PCV system can dispose of them, an increasing surplus becomes trapped in the crankcase, causing excess pressure and, inevitably,  oil leaks.  Even the most carefully sealed gaskets leak when confronted by rising internal crankcase pressure. A properly functioning PCV system will expel the gases from the crankcase faster than the engine produces them.  In addition, the low-level vacuum draws in fresh air to the crankcase from the crankcase breather. In 99% of normal driving conditions, this is how a properly functioning PCV system works. Obviously, the gasket’s job is made easier when the crankcase...
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