Why Turbocharging? Simple advice for beginners

Why Turbocharging? Simple advice for beginners

By Doug Erber: In the United States, OEM’s (Original Equipment Manufacturers) are turning to turbocharging as a method of downsizing engine displacement and increasing fuel economy. At the other end of the spectrum, those in charge of developing high-performance and racing engines, are targeting it for substantial power gains. The OEM’s regard GDI (Gasoline Direct Injection) as a key enabler for utilizing turbochargers to downsize the engine displacement. With modern direct injection coupled to variable cam timing, added power output generated by turbo boost is now exploited more fully than before without risk of detonation yet with significant benefits in fuel economy when running under light load. As a result, OEMs are shrinking the displacement of the engine, leading to weight and fuel economy savings. However, when power is required, the turbo kicks in to provide the boost, adopting the feel of a larger displacement engine. Turbos for OEM applications are sized to provide the best combination of low-end torque and peak power. In the Aftermarket, turbocharging is a relatively easy way to significantly increase the power density of an engine. In simplest terms, adding more air and more fuel to an engine will create more power.  Of course one must take care to assure engine and vehicle systems are adequately prepared to handle this additional power. Most systems will add an intercooler to reduce intake manifold temperatures and aftermarket ECU to control fueling and ignition. Depending on boost level, consideration for upgrades include, but not limited to, cylinder head gasket, head bolts clutch, pistons, connecting rods, crankshaft, transmission and differential. All components will be exposed to the rigors of additional power.  ...
Eddie fixes downside of serpentine belt kits

Eddie fixes downside of serpentine belt kits

By Vic Moore: I often wonder how Joe Rode, the able manager of Eddie’s Motorsports, will cap his career. Why? Because he’s constantly observing, endlessly productive. Tall, lanky even, with a physique that doesn’t vary too much, I remember studying him on foot along a crowded corridor at a PRI show some years ago, his strides were inordinately long, he hugged the wall because it was the quickest path forward through the throngs and he traveled three times faster than anyone else. Rarely sharp or opinionated, his voice is usually peppered by a compliment or two, but it is his substance that makes him special—a calling that requires him to get things done. This week he has unveiled Eddie’s most important new product in over a year: eight-rib serpentine pulley kits. Cleverly, this pulley kit is fully independent; it doesn’t rely on various cylinder head mountings. Instead it uses the water pump’s mounting base for consistent trouble-free installation. Here are details of the kits’ merits and its appearance when installed: S-Drive Plus Eight-Rib Serpentine Pulley Kits from Eddie Motorsports › 33% greater contact patch than standard six rib kits › Improved belt traction limits slippage in higher horsepower applications › Handles increased torque loads of 33% more than six rib › Greatly reduces Span Vibration(belt whip/belt waves) › Improved belt life Eddie Motorsports offers the most complete serpentine pulley system on the market. One part number provides everything you need to embellish the front of an engine including all accessories, fasteners, pulleys, and belt. – Simple, trouble free installation using simple hand tools – No need to chase pieces...
Motown LS: Unfamiliar hybrid

Motown LS: Unfamiliar hybrid

By Sam Logan: What’s the motivation for adapting LS cylinder heads to a small-block Chevrolet engine? Why not just go out and buy a used LS-series? It’s a modern power unit; it’s bestowed with high flowing heads, it’s readily available and it’s affordable…all the benefits you could desire. Except there’s a catch—the inconvenient fact is there’s a ton of work required to get it installed properly, coupled to appreciable expenditures. If you are empowering any pre-1990s Muscle car with an LS-series engine it is usually not a simple swap. And it’s not just exploring engine and transmission mounting solutions and clutch actuation, but there are EFI and ignition considerations, a fuel system design as well as numerous cooling and engine accessories questions to resolve. The fact is that mounting a pair of LS-series cylinder heads on a small-block is a much more practical solution. Likely, the most interesting new engine for 2016 will be the Motown LS. Under the insightful command of Dick Boyer, the architect of the last year’s 454 Man O’ War Ford block, World Products committed to foundry tooling expenses for the production of such a hybrid. It is unique. Weighing 210lb and employing standard LS deck height, the Motown LS is a cast iron small-block that accepts LS-series cylinder heads. Boyer’s uncommon design made its first appearance in public at December’s PRI show. Available in two versions, a street-strip and a race variant, he had displayed the former although not yet tested. When tested the 427cu in engine generated just under 640hp at 6,400rpm. Not bad for a street-based engine. The drag race version uses...
New Motown Pro Lightweight SBC Block From World Products

New Motown Pro Lightweight SBC Block From World Products

World Products has introduced a new lightweight cast-iron small block for racing and performance applications. Weighing in at a nominal 178lb the Motown Pro Lightweight is cast from a special 40,000psi iron alloy for increased strength while weighing significantly less than typical aftermarket blocks. The new block is available with either a standard SBC cam journal and lifters, or with a BBC cam journal and 0.904in lifter bores to provide enhanced valve train stability and performance. The priority main oiling system has been revised to accommodate the 0.904in lifter upgrade without the added cost of bronze lifter bushings. Oil passages have been enlarged and provision for oil restrictors is built into the valley, further enhancing the high rpm potential by providing improved oil supply and control. Ductile iron main caps are fitted with 4-bolt splayed caps on #2, 3 and 4 main journals and 2-bolt caps for #1 and 5 which allow easy oil pan fitment. The main caps are secured by high strength 7/16in ARP bolts for maximum stability. Clearance for a 4.000in stroke crankshaft is provided and connecting rods, which offer clearance for the BBC cam option with the 4.000in stroke are also available. The Siamese cylinder bores are offered in either 3.995in or 4.120in (to finish at 4.000in or 4.125in) with a maximum bore of 4.185in to accommodate larger cubic inch displacement. World’s new Motown Pro Lightweight block offers tremendous performance potential in a new lightweight package that will appeal to both circle track racers and drag racers. Part numbers for the new SBC blocks are: 083010 – 3.995in Bore, 350 mains, standard SBC cam journal...
How Stef’s developed first crankcase vacuum pump kits for drag racing engines

How Stef’s developed first crankcase vacuum pump kits for drag racing engines

Written by Moore Good Ink One night in the dyno room at Jenkins Competition in the early 1990s, engine builder Gary Stropko and shop foreman Stevie Johns were discussing the merits of scavenging the gases from John’s Competition Eliminator engine and wondered what might happen if a vacuum could be applied to the crankcase. So they asked Bill, or “Grump” as they called him. “Yeah,” said Grump, “You could take an air injection reaction pump and modify it to create a vacuum.” He went on to describe exactly how to accomplish the task, and Stropko scrupulously followed his advice. “It was worth a ton of power and soon we realized the more vacuum we created, the more power we made,” bridled Stropko. “Moreover, we were able to exploit the advantages of running lighter rings and less ring pressure.” At that time Joe Stefanacci had recently formed Stef’s, specializing in custom and production racing oil pans, a trade that had occupied him since 1974. Joe knew about the crankcase vacuum pump innovation, and asked Bill if he would allow him to build the kits and sell them. But Bill had him sworn to secrecy and asked him to wait a year. One year later Joe again inquired if he could produce the revolutionary kits. Bill said, “Yes,” and Stef’s began developing and supplying the first complete crankcase vacuum pump kits for drag racing engines. Today Stef’s news is of the first complete oil filter adapter kit for LS engines with aftermarket steel oil pans. Like the crankcase vacuum pump kit from the early 1990s, it is unique. Read about Stef’s...
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