How Kaase’s 2017 EMC-winning engine proved a point:

How Kaase’s 2017 EMC-winning engine proved a point:

This two-paragraph brief from engine builder Jon Kaase was uncovered during our research of the more extensive accompanying article on valve springs, valve clearance, bounce, float and surge.   Excessive valve spring pressure and its effect on lifters  By Alfie Bilk   Excessive valve spring pressure is detrimental to power production, as it creates more friction on the lifters. “On my last year’s Edsel EMC contender,” recalls Kaase,” I had single conical springs and noticed the intake adopting a rhythm and floating the valves about 6,000rpm.  So, I installed stronger springs and lost 15hp. I speculated the deficiency may involve the intake valves only, and I put the weak springs back on the exhaust, as those valves are smaller and lighter, and the engine picked up 7hp.”   Most of the power losses implicated by the use of stronger springs are caused by lifter friction. “The stronger the spring,” he explains, “the harder it is to raise the lifter. Even though you get some of it back when it’s closing, you are pushing it sideways against the lifter bore. This sideways force is called the pressure angle. A flat tappet is less threatened than a roller lifter. In the case of the roller lifter, you impose all kinds of pressure on the sides of the lifter bores. So the more spring pressure you apply the more power it consumes. Cup car teams learned these lessons and, as a matter of course, run light valves and light spring pressures.”   To read the about Kaase’s 2017 EMC winning engine click here.   Source Kaase Racing Engines, Inc. 735 West Winder...
Resurrected from the depths after 34 years.

Resurrected from the depths after 34 years.

By Freddie Heaney:   Donald Campbell’s 300mph record-breaking jet-powered hydroplane, Bluebird K7, has been rebuilt. The vessel was salvaged in March 2001 from the bottom of Lake Coniston, in Cumbria, England, following Campbell’s fatal crash in 1967. It is now readied for testing. Forty-five year-old Campbell died when the 12-year-old watercraft became airborne, back-flipped, crashed and partially disintegrated. Campbell had been travelling at over 300mph in an attempt to break his own 276mph water-speed record. Two months after raising the remains of the Bluebird, in May 2001, Campbell’s body was discovered still wearing his blue nylon overalls. The Bluebird restoration project was undertaken by a team of volunteers from Tyneside in the northeast of England and led by diver and engineer Bill Smith. The restored craft, which has already traveled at 100mph on Loch Fad on the Isle of Bute near Glasgow, Scotland, is currently undergoing tests for water tightness and its ability to withstand wave buffeting. Smith said, “We’ve been 15 years in the rebuild – five years of stripping, cataloging, and cleaning, and ten years since setting the craft’s first rivet. Once these tests are completed, there’s the hope the Bluebird will be showcased at speed back in Cumbria.” The son of British speed record breaker of the 1920s and ‘30s Sir Malcolm Campbell, Donald set eight world speed records in the 1950s and 60s–seven on water and one on land. He remains the only person to accomplish both world land and water speed records in the same year (1964). In 1960 at the Bonneville Salt Flats, he was hospitalized with a fractured skull and burst eardrum...
Recalling Sig Erson: the rise of an unusual mind

Recalling Sig Erson: the rise of an unusual mind

This story languished for a month, at least; materials revealing the timeless technique of racing camshaft development seemed uncomfortably far away. Then Californian Lyle Larson, the accomplished former drag racer, emerged with illuminating experiences from the nineteen sixties and seventies that we feared had been lost. Two weeks later, we found Steve Tanzi near Lake Tahoe with a further treasure trove of material, turning possibility into reality during the 1990s and early years of this century. More recently, Jack McInnis discovered some wonderfully evocative printed materials and photographs that illustrate much of what has long been relevant to hot rodders and motor racers and like-minded persons.     By Sam Logan.   Five and a half decades ago, in 1963, the shop foreman at Isky Racing Cams in Los Angeles departed to form his own camshaft company. He called it Sig Erson Racing Cams. He orchestrated its agenda, and he led its pursuits until he sold it in 1982. In business, his central aim was inseparbly linked to the tricky concept of keeping his customers and distributors happy. In outdoor activities, Erson was unusually adventurous and in practical terms, particularly in surviving the austerity of desert life, he was unsurpassed. In his youth, there were periods when he lived on the beach by himself and could readily sleep beneath the night skies unperturbed. In Mexico’s austere landscapes, both mountainous and arid, he would embark alone on an entire Baja 1000 pre-race reconnaissance. In spending his nights in the barren wilderness, he was undismayed by the threat of being stranded or perishing on the vast, silent desert soil or alarmed...
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