Ignition for beginners

Ignition for beginners

Extracts from Drag Racer magazine, September issue: By Ben Mozart:    Early in 2017, a new capacitive discharge (CD) ignition system emerged. An innovative philosophy derived from new software—”a proprietary algorithm” as it’s known in engineering jargon, it promises substantially more than previously available. Designed to operate with a single-coil distributed spark, which includes most carbureted drag racing applications, it’s reputed to be smaller in size than any CD device with similar features. Of greater significance, it is more energy-dense, maintaining multiple spark activity from idle to 7,000rpm as well as generating greater sparking power. There are two common types of ignition systems: capacitive and inductive. The coil is supplied power by one or the other. Inductive, which is still the most common and employed on most road-going passenger cars, charges the coil with 14.6 volts and discharges between 200-300 volts into the coil’s secondary windings. Inductive systems are any of those ignition systems that do not have a capacitor energizing the coil. Inductive systems have power applied to the coil for a period of time but their electro-magnetic principals are the limiting factors as to how quickly the coil charges and how much energy it discharges. Properly seen, the standard inductive ignition system is designed to start vehicles in all climatic conditions, including those operating in temperatures of 20 degrees F. below zero rather than supporting vehicles with high compression ratios or high horsepower or high rpm. Capacitive ignition systems on the other hand are developed for high performance and racing vehicles, which operate at high RPM and generate higher cylinder pressures. Higher cylinder pressures mean the spark...
How to avoid your next traffic ticket

How to avoid your next traffic ticket

By Martha Maglone – A recent article from Your Mechanic asks: Does the type of car you drive make a difference to the amount of tickets it might receive? The most ticketed luxury car is the Lexus ES 300 and the least ticketed compact car the Honda Civic. In 2016, Insurance.com released a study ranking car models with the highest number of speeding tickets and traffic violations. Data derived from over 323,000 offenses, revealed the Lexus ES 300 and the Nissan 350Z were the highest ticketed cars, with about one-third of drivers caught violating traffic laws particularly those involving speeding. But does the category of vehicle make a difference in the amount of tickets it received? When classified by luxury cars, mid-sized, compact, sports cars, pickup trucks, SUVs, and subcompact cars, it revealed some interesting findings, not least the types of drivers typically receiving the most, and least tickets. It’s important to note that traffic violations can differ from state to state, but some of the most common include running a red light, driving at night without headlights, illegal turns, illegal parking, or running a stop sign. Speeding laws also fluctuate based on the State and road conditions. This article gives data on ten categories of cars. Read...
Streamlined Era – Pics from the past

Streamlined Era – Pics from the past

Streamlining is a form of structure that lessens resistance and turbulence to air flow. Although its golden age is normally associated with the nineteen-thirties, the first streamlined car, the Rumpler Tropfenwagen emerged in 1921. Streamline-inspired forms were most prominent in aircraft designs, but they were also applied to trains, buses, even buildings with their beautifully rounded frontages, and trucks. Here are a few sleek old haulers, some depicted in their original settings, that might keep you endlessly amused.  ...
To intercool or not to intercool?

To intercool or not to intercool?

But first an amusing brief story involving a BBC, an intercooler, and Freon. By Sam Logan “I’m no authority on intercoolers,” admits performance carburetor specialist Dale Cubic of CFM, “but I do recall a memorable moment five years ago that involved one. Nothing too scientific,” he adds; nonetheless, it seemed an anecdote worth telling. The noted carburetor specialist had visited an engine builder’s shop with a carburetor for a 1600hp 565ci supercharged big-block Chevrolet. The engine was already installed on the dyno and suspended above it an intercooler. Unsurprisingly, with the intercooler connected, the engine improved by 50–80hp. But then the engine builder unexpectedly produced a can of Freon, purchased from a local parts store, and reached up and sprayed some of its contents over and around the intercooler. He then hastened to the dyno room and made a pull. “It gained a further 40hp! Spraying Freon on that intercooler was like feeding it with nitrous oxide,” remembers Cubic. But the mischief didn’t end there, to further mark the occasion it blew the plumbing off the supercharger! The engine was powered by a small Dominator and a Stage II ProCharger and the Freon had condensed the charge sufficiently to pack in more air than anticipated. Intercool or not to intercool? Racers, by instinct, explore every avenue that might lead them to more power. They know that the introduction of compressed air to the cylinders generates heat and excessive heat provokes early detonation. The common solution for expelling excessive heat is to install an intercooler. But what about hot rodders who enjoy most of their driving pleasures at part-throttle on...
52mm Blow-off valve for all single and twin TorqStorm supercharger kits

52mm Blow-off valve for all single and twin TorqStorm supercharger kits

TorqStorm’s co-founder Chris Brooker when asked his response when inquirers refer to his particular centrifugal supercharger as a ProCharger, “I admire what they have done,” he admits. “They’ve dominated the market so extensively that their trade name sometimes supplants the category name – but we’re constantly improving.” In those two sentences, perhaps, is the reason why Brooker and his relatively new supercharger company are progressively becoming such interesting rivals. Here is their latest announcement: a new blow-off valve. TorqStorm Superchargers has increased the size of their compressor blow-off valve from 38mm to 52mm. The new device was a logical step to ease the work load on the supercharger’s compressor wheel—a move precipitated partly because their existing 38mm unit was operating near full capacity and partly because the new 52mm successor offers better control of air. Connected to the 3.0 inch intake tract, TorqStorm’s new blow-off valve features a spring-loaded piston inside the valve’s aluminum housing and a 1/4in nipple on its cap that delivers a source of vacuum. Made of silicon bronze, the piston is closed by the power of the spring and opened by the power of 18psi of vacuum. The effect of the vacuum compresses the spring, allowing the piston to draw away from its seat, thus releasing unwanted boost pressure to the atmosphere through three elongated windows on the valve’s housing. Whoooosh! Now supplied with all new kits, TorqStorm’s compressor blow-off valve measures 2-3/4inches in diameter and 4-5/8in long and is made entirely at their Michigan premises. For BOV upgrades, price including aluminum nipple for mounting to a tube $200.00. More information on how the compressor blow-off...
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