Warning from Fang: More power from nozzle change

Warning from Fang: More power from nozzle change

More venom from Fang II – largest flowing 1/16th nitrous nozzle at 90-degrees yet • Largest nitrous orifice in production – increases flow rate • Individual channels for all passages – seal cannot rupture or leak • Direct replacement for any fogger system – uses same N2O and fuel inlets • Stainless steel construction – 1/16th pipe with 90-degrees N2O discharge   Huntington Beach, California: Nitrous Supply has introduced significant improvements to the design of their new Fang II nozzle. Fuel is discharged via the two fang-like orifices beneath the larger nitrous opening, creating better fuel atomization across the entire plume. Mike Thermos, the nitrous specialist of almost forty years says, “If there is another 90-degree nozzle that flows more than this, I’m unaware of it.” As a result it is free of restrictions; it eliminates back pressure in the system. A jet of any given orifice will now flow consistent to that orifice. The Fang II nozzle is expected to be priced similar to the Fogger.   Source: Nitrous Supply Huntington Beach, CA 714-373-1986...
Handsome hat from TorqStorm Superchargers: more hood clearance less turbulence

Handsome hat from TorqStorm Superchargers: more hood clearance less turbulence

TorqStorm has announced a new carb hat to be included with all their 2017 and onward carbureted single supercharger kits. Cast in lightweight aluminum (approx 2.25lbs) and more elegant by far than the two-can profile of its predecessor, it has shrunk in height to just 3.25 inches to reduce threats of minimal hood clearance. For the most part, transferring pressurized air from a supercharger via a right-angle turn into the carburetor can be a tricky calculation—turbulence means power loss. Accordingly, TorqStorm collaborated with air flow specialist Dave Visner in its creation. Visner, who honed his talents in fluid dynamics with Detroit’s major players and more recently in Pro Stock, applied his craft efficiently. He also bestowed the hat with appealing oval proportions, a flat-sided oval inlet port (4in x 1.75in), and a sense of luxury and quality. Measuring just under 8 inches in diameter at its widest, TorqStorm provides an O-ring to seal the hat to a 4150-style carburetor flange and three domed, stainless steel hexagon nuts—1/4-20tpi, 5/16-18 and 3/8-16—one of which will secure the hat to the centrally located stud of the carburetor. The nuts are flanged and grooved on their undersides and each contains an O-ring. The carburetor hat’s flat-sided oval inlet uses a 3.5in silicone reducing elbow and a special Clampco 4.0in T-bolt clamp to connect with the metal tube and blow-off valve assembly.   For more information contact: TorqStorm Superchargers 3001 Madison SE, Wyoming, MI 49548 Telephone (616) 706-5580 or visit www.TorqStorm.com or email...
How to adjust a carburetor choke

How to adjust a carburetor choke

New Jersey native Ray Bohacz is a respected engine builder. Though he relished the challenge of preparing race-winning engines, his earliest memories were linked to farming and its many aspects—particularly its mechanics. Recently he has combined these interests by demonstrating the value of short, technical trouble-solving videos. No doubt most of us have encountered problems with carburetor chokes, so watch for Ray’s good...
America’s first help line for race engine builders:

America’s first help line for race engine builders:

Joe Hornick and his unusual service. By Victor Moore: “He’s been an absolute master at soaking up knowledge, which has been a great help to us. He applies it intelligently and explains it in simple terms,” says John Force’s Funny Car crew chief Jimmy Prock. In our racing world, from Sportsman level to F1, it is those with acutely sharp brain power that gain the decisive edge. Though not always recognized by the public at large, top teams know them, know their capacities and know they are indispensible. Joe Hornick is one such and like a rare trumpeter swan, when he’s in full flight his capabilities are something to see. “As an engineer, he is the best I’ve known,” says race engine builder Jack Cornett. “I first met him in 2011 and hired him initially as a consultant to unravel mysteries within our valve train assemblies. It didn’t take him long.”     Hornick, who grew up in Madison, Minnesota gained an aptitude for the skills required to develop advanced racing engines. His technique was mostly conventional: endless research and careful analyses. More unconventional, however, has been his embrace of all types of internal combustion engine development from nitro methane to alcohol, gasoline, to diesel, from drag racing to oval track—both asphalt and dirt, he even advises on and develops engine systems for marathon boat racing. He learns from them all. Says Richie Gilmore of ECR’s engine shop (Richard Childress Racing) in North Carolina: “It’s the extensiveness of his experience with racing engines that sets him apart. There are very few individuals like him. When NASCAR adopted the taper...
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