The allure of Goodwood

The allure of Goodwood

By Bertie Scott Brown: When you first stand at Goodwood’s St. Mary’s corner, a fast, sweeping left hander, and race cars explode into view, you completely forget everything—your camera settings, your notes, the name of the race—every rational thought can vanish except one: this is living! An enticing step back in time, the annual Goodwood Revival is the world’s largest historic motor racing event. Staged every September since 1998, the venue is located near Chichester, a West Sussex cathedral city situated near England’s Southeast coast. Each year the Revival introduces an unfailingly unique experience to a sellout crowd of nearly 150,000. They attend in period clothing, marvel at the world’s most enchanting motor cars, bikes, and planes and revel in its inviting atmosphere. It remains the only international motor sport venue that has been preserved in its original form. Goodwood commemorates a racing era that began in 1948 and ended in 1966. During the second German war, the grounds had served as a Battle of Britain airfield and when the RAF closed the base after the war, landowner Freddie March, grandfather to current owner Earl of March, converted the perimeter road into a racing circuit. This year’s event took place on September 11-13 and included 15 races for cars and motorcycles that had been constructed up to and including the year of 1966. A special tribute to motor sport legend Bruce McLaren was laid on as was a celebration of the 50th anniversary of Shelby’s Daytona Coupe. Also, Sir Jackie Stewart demonstrated the BRM P261 in which he won the Italian F1 GP exactly 50 years ago to the...
Grass Bridge: Beacon of engineering prowess and daring act

Grass Bridge: Beacon of engineering prowess and daring act

By Archie Bilk: In racing we are keenly aware of load paths and forces. When we find more power, more downforce, more traction, it usually reveals more consequences—the next weakest link. Of course, this is the fascination that draws inquisitive minds to our industry. It is they who are our problem-solvers, and we survive on their astuteness. For centuries Peruvian villagers have been constructing a bridge from grass that is installed in three days and renewed every year. Their motivation was simple: natives needed to find a way to cross a wide, deep ravine and the most common material available to them was grass. The inspiration to convert grass into braided cords, ropes, and finally large diameter cables was the mark of considerable insight by the their ancient ancestors, the Inca, conquered by the Spanish in 1572. To view this brief yet captivating model of remarkable engineering click...