Kaase launches new Boss Nine engine kits

By Titus Bloom, July 24, 2014 -Created for use on common Ford 429-460 big-blocks -Simple assembly with conventional parts Winder, Georgia: For engine builders, and enthusiasts with ambitions in hot rod engine assembly, Jon Kaase has introduced the Boss Nine in a new kit form. Among the kit’s more prominent components, Kaase includes his noted semi-hemi cylinder heads with accompanying pistons, pins and rings as well as pushrods, shaft-mounted rockers and induction system. Everything to complete the full assembly is supplied. Though power production may vary from 500 to 1,000hp in naturally aspirated form and up to 1,500hp under forced induction, it is the engine’s evocative appearance and heritage that heightens its universal appeal. Predictably, options abound and powder-coated cast valve covers are available in silver, red and black. Indeed, in any color that can be identified by a paint code. In addition fabricated sheet metal covers are offered in natural aluminum finish. In performance the Boss Nine’s magic is ignited by increasing its stroke length from the original late-nineteen-sixties specification of 3.590in. “Those big-port heads,” contends Kaase, “don’t like stroke lengths shorter than 4in., and respond enthusiastically to 4.150in, 4.300in or 4.500in, all of which we use.” Because the longer 4.500in stroke causes the piston to protrude from the cylinder at bottom dead center, Kaase recommends a Race block or a “79” block, which has a 0.250in longer cylinder wall. Produced from 1979 to the mid-‘90s these can be identified by the nomenclature D9 on the block’s external surface. “They’re robust,” declares Kaase, “and we have one at the shop. It is 0.030in over-bored with 2-bolt main bearing...
How a clever pump design saves 4 to 6hp

How a clever pump design saves 4 to 6hp

Tumultuous change? Maybe not but KRC has uncovered significant power losses with unique new test equipment By Freddie Heaney, August 1, 2014, Photography Moore Good Ink Kennesaw, GA: Recently, Chant, the engineering authority in electronic-hydraulic control systems, delivered new testing equipment to KRC, the engine pulley and power steering specialists. Strikingly, the tester, the first of its kind, has uncovered power steering system secrets reminiscent of aerodynamic revelations found in a wind tunnel. A sophisticated one-off machine, it reveals that as engine speed increases in 1,000rpm increments one power steering pump can consume twice the power of another. [See Consumption tables at end of article.] The news, a defining moment for some, could contribute a decisive edge to not only NASCAR race teams who cherish every part of a horsepower gain but also to road race teams and short track oval racers. Surprisingly, the tester further confirms that a small 5.9cc pump is capable of developing as much flow as a bigger pump while consuming half the horsepower. During recent tests with several GM-style power steering pumps modified for competition, the tester demonstrated they absorb around 3.6hp at 8,000rpm engine speed. By comparison KRC’s Pro Series 5.9cc pump used on Aston Martin’s victorious Le Mans sportscars absorbs 1.9hp. All pumps were tested with 125psi of load applied, which is the average pressure generated in a power steering system when operating in the straight ahead position. Using data acquisition and a GoPro camera to identify power loses Beyond this the tester not only measures pressure and flow and calculates power consumption but also duplicates the data acquired on a racing...

Brian Brown prevails at 360 Knoxville Nationals with Charlie Garrett power

By Alfie Bilk, August 10, 2014 Hanover, PA: The feeling on Saturday night August 2nd was one of jubilation. Brian Brown (34), the gifted sprint car racer from Grain Valley, Missouri, had won the 24th Annual 360 Nationals at the Knoxville Raceway, in Iowa and Charlie Garrett’s home was filled with mirth! “It’s everybody’s dream to win the Nationals,” declared Garrett, “but it’s very difficult to do—it’s so fiercely competitive it’s even difficult to make the field! Of the 106 entries at this year’s event, only 24 cars are selected to race in the finals. They are the best of the best and this year we won it.” “The 360 engine is not my specialty,” admits Garrett, “I’ve only built two in my life, but Brian talked me into building one.” The 360s are not as powerful as the 410s but they are more durable, and will probably run 20 shows. Assuming you have sufficient, reliable power your biggest challenge is to qualify well.” Qualifying for the Knoxville Nationals, which is determined by points, begins on Wednesday night when the organizers run half of the entered teams. The remaining half is run the following night. The total points available are 500. Quickest time is worth 200 points, heat win is worth a further 100, and winning the A-main on Wednesday or Thursday evening is worth a further 200 points. Good point scores represent a good starting position. Brian Brown’s 360 sprint car accumulated 496. Almost the perfect score, they put him on pole for Saturday’s night’s big race. Brown has been racing sprint cars for 15 years, almost half...
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