The World’s Smallest Petrol Engine

Compliments from racers, Ted & Nancy James Originally posted by The Register, June 19, 2003 SCIENTISTS have allegedly built the smallest petrol engine, tiny enough to power a WATCH. The mini-motor, which runs for two years on a single squirt of lighter fuel, is set to revolutionize world technology. It produces 700 times more energy than a conventional battery despite being less than a centimeter long (Not even half an inch!). It could be used to operate laptops and mobile phones for months doing away with the need for recharging. Experts believe it could be phasing out batteries in such items within just six years. The engine, minute enough to be balanced on a fingertip, has been produced by engineers at the University of Birmingham. Dr Kyle Jiang, lead investigator from the Department of Mechanical Engineering, said: “We are looking at an industrial revolution happening in peoples’ pockets. The breakthrough is an enormous step forward. Devices which need re-charging or new batteries are a problem but in six years will be a thing of the past.”  Other applications for the engine could include medical and military uses, such as running heart pacemakers or mini reconnaissance robots. At present, charging an ordinary battery to deliver one unit of energy involves putting 2,000 units into it. The little engine, because energy is produced locally, is far more effective.  One of the main problems faced by engineers who have tried to produce micro motors in the past has been the levels of heat produced. The engines got so hot they burned themselves out and could not be re-used. The Birmingham team overcame...

The World's Smallest Petrol Engine

Compliments from racers, Ted & Nancy James Originally posted by The Register, June 19, 2003 SCIENTISTS have allegedly built the smallest petrol engine, tiny enough to power a WATCH. The mini-motor, which runs for two years on a single squirt of lighter fuel, is set to revolutionize world technology. It produces 700 times more energy than a conventional battery despite being less than a centimeter long (Not even half an inch!). It could be used to operate laptops and mobile phones for months doing away with the need for recharging. Experts believe it could be phasing out batteries in such items within just six years. The engine, minute enough to be balanced on a fingertip, has been produced by engineers at the University of Birmingham. Dr Kyle Jiang, lead investigator from the Department of Mechanical Engineering, said: “We are looking at an industrial revolution happening in peoples’ pockets. The breakthrough is an enormous step forward. Devices which need re-charging or new batteries are a problem but in six years will be a thing of the past.”  Other applications for the engine could include medical and military uses, such as running heart pacemakers or mini reconnaissance robots. At present, charging an ordinary battery to deliver one unit of energy involves putting 2,000 units into it. The little engine, because energy is produced locally, is far more effective.  One of the main problems faced by engineers who have tried to produce micro motors in the past has been the levels of heat produced. The engines got so hot they burned themselves out and could not be re-used. The Birmingham team overcame...

First filtered reservoir for power steering systems

By Ben Mozart -Filter intervenes before harmful particles are passed to pump -Doesn’t impede steering fluid flow. -Reservoir swivels 360° to point return line in any direction Kennesaw, Georgia: KRC is launching a new power steering reservoir. Its principal, Ken Roper says, “This is the first filtered power steering reservoir of its kind.” Though small filters are often placed in the inlet and outlet ports of power steering reservoirs, this is the first with a full Oberg filter screen. Its main objective is to ensure clean fluid is conveyed to the power steering pump without causing restriction at its inlet. Initially designed for sand rails, rock crawlers, mud and desert racing vehicles it was soon discovered to be ideal for short track oval dirt cars, off-road trucks and Monster trucks. Indeed any vehicle operating in a dirty environment where the racer wants to protect an expensive competition power steering pump or steering gearbox, it will arrest dust, dirt and all contaminants. The two-piece canister measures 4.5in diameter and 4.5in tall with the 4in Oberg coarse screen sandwiched between both halves. Radial slots and a perimeter register, a flat groove, are machined in both halves to keep the screen properly seated. Conveniently, the top of the reservoir can be swiveled 360 degrees to point the return line in any direction. Though not supplied with fittings, the reservoir is equipped with a -8AN O-ring port in the side (return flow) which accepts -8AN or -6AN male nipples. The -12AN O-ring port at the bottom of the reservoir accommodates –12AN, –10AN, or –8AN male nipples to feed the pump. These O-ring fittings...

Mike’s Racing Heads: New player in Dirt Late Model

By Bertie Scott Brown Last year Mike Androwick’s big-block head designs won the Northeast Dirt Modified championship. Winner Brett Hearn with over 800 career victories, said, “I’ve never driven a smoother race engine. I can race it on any track and in any conditions.” More interesting for Chevrolet small-block racers, Androwick has created an especially innovative design for 2014. Sporting shallow 10-degree valve angles these new heads are aimed mainly at Dirt Late Model competition but will also prove useful in asphalt short track and drag racing classes where allowed. “I’m hoping for 10-plus horsepower over existing heads. I’ve seen what they’re using and I’m confident more power is available.”   -10° head for short track Dirt oval racing engines 410 to 440cu in -Also suits short-track asphalt & drag racing engines where rules permit -312cc intake runner with 2.230 or 2.250-inch intake valve flows 420cfm Concord NC: Developed from raw, un-ported type FF aluminum castings introduced by Brodix in 2012, Mike’s Racing Heads is unveiling a new 10-degree valve-angle cylinder head to suit Chevrolet Dirt Late Model aluminum small-blocks with 410 to 440-plus cubic inch displacements, 4.25in bores, and 4.50in bore spacing. The appeal for aftermarket 4.50in bore spacing over the conventional 4.40in layout is influenced by the desire to combine a larger bore with a shorter stroke, which has the reputation for accelerating faster. The 4.25in small-block bore is equivalent to that of the big-block Chevrolet; a regular small-block uses a 4.00in bore. The larger bore allows larger intake valves and Mike offers 2.230in or 2.250 with 1.625in exhaust valves. One of the two chief advantages of...
Six helpful tips you need to know about four-barrel carburetor tuning

Six helpful tips you need to know about four-barrel carburetor tuning

1.) How do I select the right size of carburetor?  Carburetor performance is largely based on the air-speed traveling though its venturis. If they are too big the air speed will be reduced, too small and vice-versa. Probably the best instruction on carburetor choice is found in the Demon Carburetor Selection guide. It is based on camshaft duration at 0.050in of valve lift, the type of intake manifold (dual plane or single plane) and the type of transmission (manual or automatic) and stall speed. Beyond this it is always best to discuss carburetor selection with a qualified technician. Click here for the Demon Carburetor Selection Guide.   2.) What is one of the most commonly overlooked carburetor-tuning issues? One of the greatest obstacles faced by amateur carburetor tuners is failing to understand the essentials of initial ignition timing. Ignition timing is affected by a host of elements including fuel type, mixture strength, combustion chamber shape, compression ratio, temperature and humidity. Bigger camshafts and larger cylinder heads with matched intake manifolds require increased ignition timing to promote better air velocity and maintain efficiency. Thus the carburetor is helpless in its plight if the initial timing is late or the timing advance curve is slow. These two potential timing impediments frequently exhibit poorer starting and drivability troubles. The ignition is always timed to fire the spark plug before the piston reaches Top Dead Center (TDC) in the cylinder. Firing before TDC is necessary because of the time it takes for the flame front to ignite the air-fuel mixture in the cylinder. Demon’s carburetor selection guide consists of helpful recommendations on ignition...
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