New dash panels for 1957 Chevrolet from Classic Thunder Road

Written by Moore Good Ink Carson City, NV: Classic Thunder Road has announced a new series of instrument panels for the 1957 Chevrolet. Available in three finishes: matte black, brushed aluminum or carbon fiber, these panels are manufactured from high quality ABS.  Offered with or without gauges and wiring harness, the main dash panel is constructed as a two piece assembly that forms a shroud around the steering column. This panel accepts a speedometer and tachometer and water temperature and oil pressure gauges. In addition a small two-gauge cluster is included which is mounted on the dash to the right of the main cluster. Styled in the fashion of the ’57 Chevrolet front fenders this two-gauge pod houses a fuel gauge and a volt meter. Classic Thunder Road offers the panels with Autometer gauges or their own High Velocity or Concours gauges. The Concours range is a low-cost line while the High Velocity is a programmable series that offers several interesting features including peak recall on the tach. The chief advantage of these new gauges is cost. Both high quality lines are priced at $649 to $949 when included with the 3-piece panels and wiring harness. With Autometer gauges the panels cost $799 to $1049. When supplied separately the panels cost $259. For further information contact: Classic Thunder Road (866) 882-3525 5225 Grumman Drive, Suite 100 Carson City, NV 89706 Visit: Classic Thunder Road www.ClassicThunderRoad.com or...
Flywheels: Attributes that are good to know

Flywheels: Attributes that are good to know

by Archie Bosman:   Most high-performance flywheels are created in billet steel or in billet aluminum. The advantage of the billet steel over the original cast iron unit is that, though they weigh the same, usually around 32lbs, the billet steel unit is significantly stronger. Crucially, it remains free of stress cracks and, therefore, safe at high engine speeds and higher clutch clamping forces. In addition billet steel flywheels operate more effectively with modern high-performance clutch friction materials than do their cast-iron counterparts. In comparison, the billet aluminum flywheel has the decisive advantage of carrying minimal weight. Generally it rids itself of half its mass—often tipping the scales at around 16lbs. Lower mass means a lower moment of inertia, which translates to faster response; that is, faster acceleration and deceleration as well as less wheel spin.  Clutch and flywheel maker Ram of Columbia, SC construct their aluminum flywheels from 6061-T6.To avoid distortion they use a 1/4in thick steel insert as a friction surface, which mates with the clutch disc friction surface. To maintain flatness the inserts are fastened to the flywheels by 18 rivets.To overcome clutch snatch or chatter and provide minimal run-out, both steel and aluminum flywheels are Blanchard-ground. The Blanchard grinder contributes a proper friction surface and also ensures the flywheel is ground parallel to the crankshaft mounting flange. In addition, Ram counter-bores the flywheels for button-head cap screws that secure the starter gear ring to the flywheel.Nonetheless, the lightness of the flywheel must be considered in conjunction with the vehicle’s gear ratio and its overall weight. If its gearing is too high and its flywheel too...

Snake & Mongoose: First drag racing movie in 29 years

Written by Moore Good Ink At this year’s SEMA show the corridor leading to the annual NHRA breakfast room was crowded. Distinguished racing figure John DiBartolomeo had arrived early. “I couldn’t believe it!” exclaimed the Drag Racing Action editor, “people have been queuing to get in since 7 o’clock.”       It was October 31 and on this particular Wednesday morning, the second day of the show, a much anticipated special treat had been prepared for drag-racing lovers and racing fans alike. It was the premiere of the movie trailer Snake and Mongoose. Surprisingly, this is the first drag racing movie since Heart like a Wheel, the 1983 biographical film based on the life of Shirley Muldowney. On hand were legends, friends, and former fierce rivals, Don “The Snake” Prudhomme and Tom “The Mongoose” McEwen. The event, which attracted a 1,600 standing-room-only crowd and held in a ballroom at the LVH (Las Vegas Hotel), was opened by Master of Ceremonies Bob Frey. To set the scene Frey introduced the movie’s writer Alan Paradise, a former magazine editor, and female co-producer Robin Broidy. Filmed in Southern California with many scenes shot at historic Auto Club Famoso Raceway in Bakersfield, Broidy said that the biggest obstacle in making the movie was finding the financial backing—someone who believed in it. After Frey presented the 5-minute official movie trailer a lively Q&A session began where attendees fired questions at McEwen and Prudhomme. The topics examined their friendship, their adversities, their fierce rivalry, and their recollections of real-life stories that inspired the motion picture. On stage, Prudhomme a tough professional drag racer with...
Clutch Slippage: Why it works on drag racing but not on street or oval track applications

Clutch Slippage: Why it works on drag racing but not on street or oval track applications

Written by Moore Good Ink Centrifugal force is useful in a drag racing application where less initial ‘hit’ is desired and the clutch’s clamp load increases with engine speed. However, centrifugal force doesn’t start to make a difference until around 5,000rpm. The load increases by the square of the engine RPM. So a graph would start out shallow at, say, 5K but by the time you reach about 10K the line is nearly vertical. The problem with centrifugal pressure for street users is that most street engines make their torque at lower engine speeds, and since centrifugal force uses light initial pressure, it fails to address high torque at low RPM. For example, if you develop a static load on a chart using two diaphragm-style pressure plates, one with 2,200lb clamp load and centrifugal weights and the other with 2,800lb clamp load without centrifugal assistance, the 2,200lb pressure plate will require an engine speed of 10,200rpm to equal the unassisted clamping pressure of the 2,800lb plate! The best approach for street and oval track applications is to apply higher clamp loads, more aggressive friction material, multiple discs, or a combination of all (like Ram’s Powergrip or Street Dual Disc units)....

New 24-page catalog from Demon Carburetion

  Written by Moore Good Ink New 24-page Demon catalogs were distributed at this year’s SEMA show from the Demon booth where 12 new Street Demon carburetors were given away to lucky participants from drawings held over 4 busy show days. The Street Demon draw attracted the interest of almost 4,000 entrants. The catalog features the new Street Demon together with the traditional line of Demon carburetors, including the Road Demon, Speed Demon, and Mighty Demon. Accessories, Tuning and Service parts are also featured as well as Demon’s new range of fuel pumps and fuel pressure regulators.   The popular SixShooter (for Tri-power set-ups) and the desirable Demon 98 (nostalgic two-barrel carburetors popular in Old School arrangements) will be re-introduced in 2013 along with the Race and King Demons. Demon Carburetion will also be displaying at this year’s PRI show in booth #3781. Catalog also available online: http://www.demoncarbs.com/Info.asp For further information contact: Demon Carburetion Telephone (270) 438-2039 E-mail ScottWitmer@DemonCarbs.com www.demoncarbs.com...
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