New Speed Demon 8-hole annular-discharge booster carburetors

Written by Moore Good Ink Seasoned tuners speaking of annular-boosted carburetors will tell you of their fine atomization qualities and their impressive capacity for generating torque, especially at low engine speeds. At high engine speeds on smaller CFM carburetors they might express a hint of caution concerning slight richness. But on competent street machines with the right combination they generally insist the annular is often in a class by itself. •Annular discharge boosters improve fuel distribution •Atomize fuel more efficiently •Generate greater torque especially at low engine speeds •Achieve better throttle response on street vehicles •Produce convincingly better part-throttle drivability •Invigorate engines impeded by lethargic air speed Dawsonville, GA: Demon Carburetion has unleashed 4 new annular-discharge Speed Demon carburetors: two 650cfm and two 750cfm. Both models are available with either mechanical- or vacuum-secondary throttle mechanisms. Their chief functions are to increase engine torque, especially at low engine speeds, and to provide first-class throttle response and drivability. This is achieved by use of 8-hole annular boost venturii with corresponding air-fuel metering circuits. The success of any annular-boosted carburetor derives from careful and accurate fuel distribution and superior air-fuel atomization. Heartening news for thousands of enthusiasts, this is particularly relevant for owners of 350-360cu in small-block Chevrolet engines and also 289-302cu in small-block Ford engines that operate with camshaft durations of up to 240 degrees @ 0.050in of valve lift. In fact these carburetors, depending upon the engine combination, could invigorate any small displacement V8 engine that’s impeded by lethargic air speed. At low engine speeds, particularly from 1,800 to 2,500rpm the annular-discharge Speed Demons can generate up to 100lb-ft of additional...

Kaase’s new P-38 small-block Ford gets stack induction

Written by Moore Good Ink Winder, GA: Jon Kaase is releasing a new stack induction system to empower his P-38 canted-valve small-block Ford engine. The operational benefits of this new sequential stack-induction system include smooth, fast and dependable engine response during rapid throttling, easy and reliable hot or cold starting, and admirable fuel efficiency. Naturally, the system ends all choke operations, generally necessary on carburetor-equipped engines when cold starting. Available in individual components or as a fully assembled kit, Kaase’s new stack induction arrangement also delivers precise cylinder-to-cylinder air-fuel distribution to any Windsor-based small-block Ford. This kit comprises an intake manifold with concealed plenum, 50 or 52mm throttle bodies with attendant linkage and bell stacks, fuel rails with correctly sized injectors, and wiring harness with ECU and sensors. These sense air and water temperatures, manifold absolute pressure, and throttle position. The plenum has sufficient vacuum ports and capacity to accommodate an idle control motor, fuel pressure regulator, power brakes, PCV, and other essentials. Most importantly it offers a range of tuning possibilities beyond the imaginings of the conventional carburetor. Injectors are selected by the following simple formula: HP x .5 (naturally aspirated) (or .6 for supercharged or .625 for turbo charged) and divided by the number of cylinders. This figure is then multiplied by .9, which represents 90 percent of the duty cycle. For example, if a naturally aspirated small-block generates 520hp the correct injector output can be calculated by multiplying 520 by .5 which comes to 260 and then dividing it by 8, which gives us 32.5. By multiplying this value by .9 our injectors should dispense 30lbs...

Wilson Manifolds Now Hiring CNC Manager, Programmer, Operator, Machinist

Job Description: Wilson Manifolds, the prominent CNC-manufacturing company in Fort Lauderdale, FL that specializes in the design, development, manufacture, assembly and testing of aftermarket automotive parts, seeks highly skilled and experienced CNC programmer for 3, 4 and 5 axis machining centers. Experience Requirements: Complex 3D part modeling design experience utilizing Solidworks Experience in AlphaCAM, SurfCAM or GibbsCAM 5-Axis tool path creation using SurfCAM Experience Pluses: Background of DMG, Haas, Fadal, and possibly Heidenhein Controls Automatic (DCC) Brown & Sharpe CMM experience using PC-DMIS Personal Requirements: Team player Good communicator Ability to prioritize multiple projects. Enthusiastic, cooperative, and positive Please submit detailed resume to...
The Boss Nine Kaase’s New Boss Nine hemi for street rods and street machines

The Boss Nine Kaase’s New Boss Nine hemi for street rods and street machines

By Ro McGonegal. Pictures by Moore Good Ink: Long-time Mountain Motor engine master Jon Kaase (Racing Engines, Winder, Georgia) says, “The stock Boss 429 parts were a masterpiece for their time, but slightly weak and difficult to work on. We made every effort [with the Boss Nine] to fix anything that was troublesome or failure prone.” At the end of 2007, Kaase decided to take “the plunge and build all new Boss 429 Ford retrofit heads and related parts. I was betting on the fact that there were other Boss fans and Ford enthusiasts out there that wanted these new parts as badly as I did. Although they’ve only been out for a short while, I’m happy to say that they have been well received and successful in whatever projects they have been used in.” Since build orders for the Boss 429 Mustang NASCAR homologation-specials ceased at 1,358 (859 were built in the spring of ’69; 499 more came to life as 1970 models later that summer), these units are rather scarce. Solving the cylinder block problem was easy. Kaase simply undertook the 429/460 big-block (in iron and aluminum) providing them with cylinder head oil drains in the correct location. The JKRE plan included using OE 460 head gaskets, so the deck surface of the Boss Nine heads is much thicker than the original dimension to provide the necessary clamping force. The Boss 429 was humorously under-rated at 375 horsepower while it probably made closer to 475 at the flywheel and without the parasitic drag of the accessories. The ports were huge, had poor low-speed velocity and didn’t begin to...
Fuel pumps: Fuelab’s electronic combo has two things that stand out

Fuel pumps: Fuelab’s electronic combo has two things that stand out

Text by Jim Mozart Photos by Moore Good Ink  Download hi-res images and text here Fuelab of Litchfield, Illinois has developed a unique fuel pump and electronic regulator. First, unlike any other, this fuel pump has a variable-speed motor. Hence it can deliver prodigious amounts of fuel at fully open throttle and minimal amounts at idle. Its variable-speed ability overcomes the chief trouble with big, powerful, high-flow single-speed fuel pumps—heat. Because high flow pumps work just as hard at idle as at fully open throttle they become hot at slow engine speeds and consequently overheat the fuel. Often they eventually self-destruct as a result. Second, unlike any other, this fuel pump is of DC (direct current) brushless design. Therefore current draw is significantly reduced and brush wear and brush drag are eradicated. For the uninitiated, an electric motor spins by way of a set of brushes that ride against a commutator on an armature. As voltage is applied to the brushes, it causes the armature to spin. Sound simple? It really is. However there are some problems with that design. In a brush-type motor, the brushes are constantly in contact with the spinning armature. As such, there is a small amount of drag on the armature at all times. In addition, the friction created by the contact also creates heat. Heat is not a desirable attribute in an electric fuel pump motor. In addition to this, a DC brush motor is only capable of operating at one speed. In the case of an electric fuel pump, this means the motor will continue to spin at the same speed and provide the same...