Demon production expands: News of Road Demons, Street Demons, and 98s

Written by Moore Good Ink Bowling Green KY: Earlier this week, on Monday, shipping resumed of the Road Demon 625 carburetors. Next week Road Demon 725 models will be re-launched. Originally introduced twelve years ago, Road Demons are easily distinguished by their tubular inlet kit, vacuum pod with quick-change spring, and smooth choke tower with electric choke mechanism. Developed for use with camshaft durations of up to 220 degrees @ 0.050in., the Road Demons are popular, entry-level general performance carburetors calibrated for Street Rods and mildly modified street machines. In April, production of the all-new 625cfm Street Demon begins. The Street Demon, which is engineered for hot rods with stock to mildly modified engines, accommodates either square- or spread-bore pattern intake manifolds. It is the first of its kind from Demon. Probably the two most compelling features of this carburetor are its triple-stack boosters, residing within its 1-3/8in primary throttle bores, and its highly unusual Goggle valve, a secondary throttling device that supplies over twice the air flow of the primaries. The first story to emerge on the Street Demon is an interview with its designer Larry Tipton. This is scheduled to appear in the April issue of MoparMax and should be visible at www.MoparMax.com on Tuesday April 3rd or shortly thereafter. Finally, Demon 98 main bodies are currently being machined at the factory. Also, work on fuel pump service parts is progressing well. Formerly manufactured and marketed under BG Fuel Systems, the fuel pump service parts will be resurrected and sold under the Demon brand. For further information contact: Demon Carburetion Telephone (270) 438-2039 E-mail Scott Witmer at: ScottWitmer@DemonCarbs.com  ...
Fuelling 1,377hp for the track and for the streets

Fuelling 1,377hp for the track and for the streets

Written by Moore Good Ink Cleveland, Ohio: Road-going cars that generate 1,377hp at the rear wheels leave a profound impression. Featured in the May 2012 issue of Hot Rod magazine, the definitive authority on hot rods, a story of Bryant Goldstone’s Chevelle appears. It tells of a 1970 model that leaves the lights in second gear on 11in tires, runs the quarter mile in 8.22 seconds at 167 miles per hour, and cruises for thousands of highway miles returning 11mpg. Three years ago when Goldstone (45) was preparing this car he presented Weldon with the challenge of providing enough fuel at full boost and a much lesser amount when cruising. These demands were only slightly complicated by a further request to run the Chevelle on race fuel and E85 if required. In the pump house: how the big pumps work. The system uses a Weldon controller (P/N 14000) and two Weldon fuel pumps (P/N 2345-A), a primary and a secondary. These units operate in conjunction with a Big Stuff3 ECU. Both Weldon pumps are in service even when the Chevelle is running on 92-93 octane pump fuel. However, when the engine is operating at less than 25 percent throttle opening, the ECU automatically directs the controller to disable the secondary pump and reduce the primary pump to run on a pulsed current only—much like a fuel injector. The pulsed current restricts the pump’s output and prevents the fuel from getting hot. Keeping the fuel cool protects against evaporation and vapors forming at the pump’s inlet port and the destructive effects of cavitation that follow. Reduced pump speeds also bring...

Corvette C4 clutch discontinued: Ram eases supply situation

Written by Moore Good Ink Columbia, SC: Since factory replacement clutches for 1989-’96 C4 Corvettes no longer exist, Ram is introducing a new direct replacement dual-disc clutch-flywheel assembly. The kit includes a hydraulic release bearing with all the fittings and hardware to complete the conversion. It connects directly to the factory master cylinder. For those accustomed to the normal push-style clutch assembly, the unorthodox pull-style mechanism used in the C4 Corvette must have seemed most irregular. In the pull-style arrangement the release bearing was responsible for pulling the fingers back to disengage the clutch—the opposite effect of conventional clutches. This and further concerns over the original lightweight alloy rimmed cover assembly caused Ram to opt for the more pragmatic push-system approach. Thus a new Ram Force 9.5 and Force 10.5 range of clutches has been created. The smaller diameter model impels the engine to rev faster; the larger model transmits larger torque loadings. The Force 9.5 dual-disc clutch and flywheel assembly for the C4 transmits up to 800ft lbs of torque. In addition to doubling torque capacity, it transmits power quietly and operates with surprisingly light pedal effort. Alternatively the firm’s Force 10.5 clutch-flywheel assembly transmits over 950 ft-lbs of torque. For smooth engagement, these units use Ram’s 300-series steel-backed friction discs and a marcel spring. For clutch strength and stability, the friction discs feature an eight-spring hub assembly with urethane encapsulated springs. And for lightness, a billet aluminum flywheel is employed with a ¼-inch thick steel insert to dissipate the heat. All assemblies are built to OEM height dimensions for easy installation—no modifications necessary. Both systems are strap-driven...

…but because air is so much lighter than fuel the air tends to turn as the fuel goes straight…

Written by Moore Good Ink Ft. Lauderdale, FL: Wilson Manifolds has worked closely with leading engine builders and racers for over 25 years and still the aim of their objectives is not always easy to comprehend, but here in the following passage is how Keith Wilson describes their task: “The velocity in the intake ports of a race engine is so fast at high rpm the air-fuel mixture must be slowed once it travels through the choke area (the smallest cross-sectional region) in order to make it turn and enter the combustion chamber. But because air is so much lighter than fuel the air tends to turn as the fuel goes straight. Our job is to persuade the fuel to turn into the chamber, recover the wasted power through equal distribution and delay premature detonation.” Cornett Racing Engines was honored recently as the COMP Cams Top Engine Builder of the Year. The recognition occurred during the Lucas Oil Late Model Dirt Series championship awards banquet in Indianapolis. It was the fourth successive year that Jack and his staff received the prestigious award. Cornett says of Wilson Manifolds, “Their craftsmanship is second to none but equally important, I like their practical approach.” Earlier this year Wilson Manifolds celebrated with a couple of NHRA Pro Stock achievements when KB Racing’s Greg Anderson won the Winternationals at Pomona, CA and his team mate Jason Line followed with a victory in Arizona. In Pomona, Anderson raced to his 71st career victory and fifth Winternationals triumph. Powered by his Summit Racing Equipment Pontiac he achieved an ET of 6.549secs at 210.87mph to hold off Jeg Coughlin Jr.’s...