Three EVO Induction Upgrades from Wilson Manifolds

Written by Moore Good Ink Fort Lauderdale, Florida: Wilson Manifolds has recently announced three stages of ported cast aluminum intake upgrades and a new, trick, high-flow D-Shaped fuel rail for the Mitsubishi EVO. Using a factory cast intake manifold, Wilson provides a mild street stage and two full-race stages—one designed for 8,000 rpm the other 9,500 rpm. Providing perfect OEM fitment, reliability, and maintaining factory emission controls on all EVO8s and 9s, Wilson employs the same custom-ported intake techniques as used on several record-setting EVOs, including the Wilson Manifolds’ 2006 EVO IX. On the two fully ported race versions, the mid- and top-end horsepower gains are exceptionally strong. Compared to stock, the rpm of the street version are substantially increased. These new kits, which fit the EVO engine type 4G63, accommodate the stock or modified stock throttle bodies as well as Wilson’s latest D-shaped fuel rails, which include stands and fittings to secure stock fuel lines. Wilson also provides an adaptor to accept their 65mm high-flow throttle body (#471065). Here below are the part numbers, descriptions, and prices: Part Number Description Racer 208101 Race Ported EVO intake for 4G63 engine to 9500 RPM $ 939.00 * 208104 Race Ported EVO intake for 4G63 engine to 8000 RPM $ 939.00 * 208107 Street Mild ported EVO intake for 4G63 engine $ 510.00 * 422200 High Flow EVO fuel rail w/ stanchions and fittings $ 179.90 087005 Throttle body adapter for #471065 65mm t-body $ 62.00 *requires a core or alternatively a core charge of $250.00 Manifolds are available for immediate delivery and fuel rails and adapters will be available soon....

TIME WARP SPECIAL: NEW KAASE FORD BOSS 429-460 CRATE ENGINES

Written By Moore Good Ink Winder, GA: The Boss 429 was available as a NASCAR homologation special in 1969-70 Mustangs (and two special Cougars) and the Ford faithful have been lusting for the Blue Crescent/Shotgun engines ever since. While others dreamed, the die-hard Ford junkies at Jon Kaase Racing Engines worked, and brought the Boss 429 back to life on its 40th anniversary.   Kaase’s modern Boss Nine combination is based on a high-nodular cast iron cylinder block that can accommodate 429, 460, 521, or 600 cubic inches and output extends from 500 to 1,000 streetable horsepower. Kaase allows that displacement beyond 521 cubic inches include a race-oriented cylinder block equipped with 4-bolt main bearing caps.   The 10.30-inch deck height block receives a cast crankshaft in the 460ci version (600hp). Engines with 521ci and beyond are founded on a 4340 steel crankshaft joined with 4340 forged connecting rods and Diamond forged pistons. For complicity with pump gas, the compression ratio is usually limited to 11.0:1 or less. Kaase caps the short-block with new aluminum cylinder heads fitted with stainless steel swirl-polish 2.30-inch intake and 1.90-inch exhaust valves activated by WW Engineering 1.75:1 aluminum roller rocker arms.   Though the rather large round intake, D-shaped exhaust ports, and marginal cam specs of the original 429 hampered low-speed response, the multiple cam phasing applied to Kaase’s Boss Nine engines has completely eliminated this problem. Customers also have the option of a hydraulic or solid roller camshaft. Bear in mind that the 521ci version produces approximately 770 horsepower and 730 foot-pounds of torque with a hydraulic roller cam. Boss Nine engines...

NEW WELDON A600-A FUEL PUMP: MORE EFFICIENT, MORE POWERFUL. SUPPORTS UP TO 800 HORSEPOWER IN STREET ROD, STREET/STRIP, ROAD RACING APPLICATIONS

Written by Moore Good Ink Oakwood Village, Ohio: Clearly, serendipity was at work. In its attempt to take advantage of economies of scale by using common end caps and port sizes across its range of flow-through pumps, Weldon realized to their surprise that its existing 600-A pump became more efficient. Weldon upgraded the 600-A with -10 inlet and outlet ports and fitted it with revised end caps. Its bigger ports allow the pump to draw more fuel, to deliver more fuel, and to do this at reduced amperage draw. The 600-A was previously equipped with a -8 inlet port and a -6 outlet port and the end caps were gold. The new A600-A is distinguished by its black-colored end caps. This continuous-duty pump, the standard in quietness, is designed for street rod enthusiasts, street/strip proponents, road racers, off-road racers—in fact, anyone with up to 600 to 700 horsepower (fuel injected) or 800 horsepower (carbureted). NHRA champion and distinguished engine builder Jeff Taylor has two customers already running them in NHRA Stock Eliminator. Further, the A600-A is the mainstay of Hilborn’s electronic fuel injection market. With carbureted applications, the A600-A should be used in conjunction with a bypassing regulator such as Weldon’s A15 or A30 as well as a blocking regulator (Weldon A2046). Weldon heartily recommends the installation of two fuel filters: a 100-micron filter before the pump and a 10-micron filter after the pump. Because of Weldon’s distinguished aerospace background, every fuel pump receives its own serial number and a corresponding flow chart. All Weldon pumps are tested with actual fuel, not testing substitutes. In fact, they take their procedures...

Roush Yates’ used 358cid Nationwide race engines with 400-800 miles of use: Great value for drag racers, vintage road racers, short track oval racers, and boat racers

Written By Moore Good Ink Mooresville, NC— Roush Yates Engines is now offering a limited number of used, complete, long-block ex-Nationwide race engines (without carburetor, intake manifold, and headers). With usage between 400 and 800 racing miles and prices starting at $16,000, these race engines should, where regulations permit, represent terrific value to drag racers, vintage road racers, short track oval racers, and boat racers.   Roush Yates-built, these 358cid engines are based on the acclaimed Ford R451 dry-sump racing block and feature a Bryant 8-counterweight crankshaft (a perfectly balanced item and $4,000 when new), top of the line connecting rods, forged pistons, and a Roush Yates-specified roller camshaft with 55mm roller cam bearings. Bore size is 4.150 inches or larger and stroke lengths vary from 3.260 to 3.300 inches depending upon bore size.   The famed Yates D3 aluminum cylinder heads, capped with Roush Yates 2-piece valve covers with oilers, are fully ported and fitted with titanium valves, retainers, and locks; Roush Yates rocker arms; Jesel dog-bone lifters; and thick-wall pushrods.  The sizes of the intake and exhaust valves are 2.150 and 1.650 inches respectively.   At the lower right side of the oil pan there resides a five-stage dry-sump pump; four stages are devoted to scavenging oil from the engine oil pan and lifter valley and one stage is devoted to providing a pressurized supply of oil to the engine.   At the front of the engine, the indispensable Yates belt-drive assembly (introduced by Robert Yates in 1994) is situated, and adjacent to it an ATI crankshaft harmonic balancer, a Stewart EMP water pump, and at the...

First new Roots-style supercharger and installation kit for Mustang GT, 1999-’04:

Written By Moore Good Ink Portland, OR: Tork Tech has developed a potent, new supercharger kit for the Mustang GT 1999-’04. Determined by gearing, it will generate 550 to 700-plus rear wheel horsepower. Using a Magnuson unit containing Eaton’s latest four-lobe high-helix TVS rotor technology, Tork Tech has added a double-pass intercooler, housed in its own intake manifold; a large heat exchanger, complete with pump; a coolant tank with all necessary plumbing; and a throttle body with intake plenum and cold-air intake tube. Of special note, the kit also includes an 8-rib independent drive-belt system with pulleys and idlers. This latest TVS blower will spin up to 25,000 rpm without losing volumetric efficiency—the bigger the crankshaft pulley, the faster it spins and therefore the more power it generates. Attempting to operate a larger crankshaft pulley on one common serpentine drive belt system presents two problems. First, space around the crankshaft pulley is limited and therefore increasing its size substantially isn’t feasible. Second, even if it were possible to run a 10- or 11-inch pulley, the alternator, water pump, power-steering pump, and air conditioning compressor would be vastly over geared. Tork Tech overcomes space and gearing limitations not by increasing the size of the supercharger but, instead, by introducing an independent drive arrangement that sits forward of the accessory belt system, where size considerations are no longer a concern. Other valuable attributes of this new Eaton technology, known as the TVS1900 (Twin Vortices Series™ which moves 1.9 liters of air with each revolution) are its instant response, at virtually any speed, and its reliability. There are several million of them...
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