Ram’s new twin-plate clutch:

How the 2010 Camaro and other LS-powered vehicles can transmit tons of grunt without chatter Written by Moore Good Ink Columbia, SC: RAM Clutches has announced a new 10.5-inch twin-plate high-performance clutch and flywheel assembly for the 2010 Camaro and other LS–powered vehicles. It’s called the Direct Fit Street Dual. With capacity to control up to 1,000 rear-wheel horsepower, this new clutch system comprises an aluminum flywheel with a replaceable shrink-fitted starter gear ring, a diaphragm cover assembly with 2,400 lb clamping pressure, and two clutch plates lined with either organic or ceramic friction materials. The organic material is of Ram’s 300 series—a proprietary mix that delivers superior clamping power, excellent drivability, and the absence of chatter on engagement. The ceramic alternative has a higher co-efficient of friction—it requires greater loadings to cause slippage; therefore, it maintains holding power while operating at higher temperatures. Ceramic friction material is often selected when strip use exceeds street use. To contend with the greater rotational forces, both friction materials are sandwiched between metal backing collars and riveted metal-to-metal, unlike the original equipment. To combat harsh street-strip use, eight clutch springs are employed. These springs are not only stiffer but also encapsulated in urethane to further increase their compression rate. The part number for Ram’s organic-style LS clutch assembly is 90-2100 while 90-2100N identifies the ceramic alternative. For strength, Ram employs a nodular iron pressure ring in their cover assembly while carefully maintaining the overall height of this twin-disc flywheel assembly for easy installation. The lightweight aluminum flywheel is SFI certified, and is produced entirely at the company’s Columbia, SC factory. To dissipate...

Roush Yates Engines Celebrates Their First Dirt Late Model Win

Written By Moore Good Ink Lake City, FL – Last Saturday night at North Florida Speedway, a medium-banked 3/8th mile clay oval at Lake City, Roush Yates Engines had their first Dirt Late Model win.  Tampa-based driver Bobby Clark drove the car to victory in both his heat race and the A-Main event.  Clark and Circle Track’s editor Rob Fisher had spent the last year rebuilding the Rayburn Dirt Late Model, replacing a 362 c.i.d. Chevy motor with a Roush Yates 358 Ford. “With redesigned chassis geometry,” Clark commented “the car handled and performed well. But the biggest improvement occurred when the team replaced the tired 362 c.i.d. Chevy motor with a fire-breathing 358 c.i.d. Ford from Roush Yates Engines, the Mooresville, North Carolina engine builder.”   In just the team’s second outing with the new power-plant, Clark had what he termed a flawless night. “Everything was clicking from the time we left the shop. I knew it was going to be a good night.”   Jeremy Anderson, the Roush Yates engine guru in charge of the company’s new Late Model program said, “The only difference between this 358 engine for Late Model racing and a Cup-spec engine is the oil pan and oil pump drive. These simple changes are made to suit the chassis. We provide these engines complete or in component form or oil pan conversion kits to facilitate existing engines for Late Model racing.”   Roush Yates Engines, who has been at the forefront of the charge in Ford racing and winners of this year’s Daytona 500, is keen to demonstrate their value to not only the...

Weldon Racing Pumps introduces the 9200-A series external oil transfer pump.

 Written by Moore Good Ink Cleveland, OH: Oil is the life blood of the drive train. Without a constant, adequate supply, parts are destined for failure, sometimes at the most inopportune moment.     To accommodate, Weldon’s 9200-A oil transfer pump circulates hot oil in transmissions and differentials and has been designed to meet the demanding rigors of racing and OEM applications. They have been manufactured using the same stringent quality requirements and exacting specifications as Weldon’s electric racing fuel pumps.   Flow rate for the 9200-A is 30 gallons per hour of 300-degree F 80-90W differential gear oil or ATF. Further, the current draw is only 5.5 amps. At 3 pounds and measuring 2.50×5.40-inches, weight and dimensions are compact.   Why contemplate the 9200-A pump?  Although very few are willing to divulge the information, the 9200-A is presently being used on a number of front runners’ superspeedway cars in Cup and Nationwide series. In fact, it is the only pump known to be used in circle track racing for transmission and differential cooling.   Further, it has been approved for use in export C5 and C6 Corvettes destined for warmer climates. Weldon is also working on a prototype high-temperature oil transfer pump for the new Cadillac CTS-V.  This pump can be found in the GM Motorsports catalog under PN 12480080.    Features    Internal Relief Valve prevents system damage. The valve is designed to lift sufficiently to relieve fluid pressure build-up over setting. These valves help protect vessel and piping system damage from over pressurization. To ensure that oil pressure does not exceed the rated maximum, a spring-loaded pressure...

Win a Roush Yates 360 Sprint Car Engine

Written By Moore Good Ink Mooresville, NC—Roush Yates Engines, engine builders extraordinaire and winners of this year’s Daytona 500, has just announced an amazing 360 Sprint Car contest: Winners powered by a Roush Yates engine at this year’s 42nd Western World Sprint Car National Championships at Tucson, AR, Nov. 19-21, will also WIN A NEW ROUSH YATES ENGINE. This contest extends to the winners of both winged and non-winged categories.   “We’re real excited about Roush Yates’ involvement with the ASCS Sprint Car Dirt Series at Tucson’s USA Raceway in our season-ending event, the 42nd Annual Western World Sprint Car Championship. Roush Yates’ promotion with the winged and non-winged teams at the Western World speaks loudly about the commitment they have placed in the future of the ASCS Sprint Car Dirt Series,” said ASCS founder, Emmett Hahn.   Roush Yates Engines recently entered the 360 Sprint Car scene with Chuck “the Cobra” Hebing. Hebing achieved an early victory at Autodrome Drummond, Quebec. “This new engine has a long power curve, sustaining peak horsepower from 6,500 to 8,500 rpm—exceptional power all the way through,” Hebing commented.   When news of this contest emerged yesterday, Kevin Montgomery, promoter at USA Raceway, was delighted: “The Western World Championships is shaping up to be one of the premier events of 2009. We are excited to have Roush Yates, an auto racing icon, as part of this Championship Race. Their involvement speaks volumes about the prestige of the 42nd Annual Western World Championships.”   Roush Yates supplies their new 360 Sprint Car engines as custom-built and as complete as the customer wishes—including turn-key ready-to-race...

Amazing entry to TORC Series by ROUSH YATES ENGINES:

Written by Moore Good Ink Five victories from six starts Mooresville, NC. In order to win the race, you must have the equipment to finish the race. As the engine is the core of all such endeavors, it must perform reliably and repeatedly. No one is more acutely aware of this fact than Roush Yates Engines, an amalgam of NASCAR wizards Jack Roush and Robert Yates, known for their construction of 358 cubic inch engines (operating at 9,600rpm) as mandated by NASCAR, ARCA, and Craftsman Truck Series, among others. As of mid-summer 2008, Roush Yates 436 cubic inch engines have been particularly devastating in the WSORR (World Series of Off-Road Racing) and TORC (The Off-Road Championship Series) domains. What makes ‘em tick? According to Roush Yates’ Off-Road Engine manager 46-year-old Mike Kasch, “The peak is 900 horsepower and remains fairly constant between 7,400 and 8,200 rpm. Torque climbs to 675 pounds-feet at 6,000 rpm. “We build the engine packages with aluminum cylinder blocks and heads and manage them with 6-stage dry-sump oiling systems. These trucks run much like a road course but with jumps, so they are on and off the throttle as traction allows. Right now, we use the same package for both 2WD and 4WD, other than we advance the cam a slight amount in the 4WD because of the extra pull they get in the lower rpm ranges and especially off the corners,” Kasch said. What makes these engines so overwhelming is a direct result of two key areas–induction system sophistication and reliability. Indeed, the foundation of the induction system is Yates and his legendary cylinder...